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Tuesday, April 2
 

9:00am MDT

Are Computer Science and Information Systems Students More Likely to Earn a Better Grade in Basic Computer Literacy Courses Than Their Peers: A Case Study
Computer Science and Information Systems students spend the majority of their University level coursework studying computer hardware and software. These courses are typically judged more difficult, either technically or theoretically, than traditional digital literacy courses that teach basic computer fundamentals such as the Microsoft Office Suite. This paper presents final grade data from a medium sized university that helps explore this issue.

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Harris

Laurie Harris

Southern Utah University, Southern Utah University


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:07am MDT
ST - Kolob Canyon Living Room
  Digital & Information Literacy

9:00am MDT

Administrative Ethics: Personal Dilemmas vs. Public Duty
After the Obergefell v. Hodges ruling, which provides same-sex couples equal right to marry, several states worked quickly to ensure that the rights of their public servants, such as county clerks, by creating new legislation and policies that protected the public servants’ personal beliefs or interests.

States such as Alabama, had judges order the county clerks to not issue marriage certificates to same-sex couples, even though the Supreme Court ruled in favor of same-sex couples.

There were several prominent incidents in which a clerk or other public servant refused to issue same-sex couples a marriage license or certificate on the basis of the public servant’s “religious or deeply held belief’ and often that belief does not include marriage for same-sex couples. The most notable refusal came from a Kentucky County Clerk, Kim Davis in 2015.

A public servant may claim that by issuing a marriage license or certificate to a same-sex would be putting them in a dilemmatic situation, or a situation that causes them to go against their “deeply held belief.” Because of this, several states have enacted Religious Freedom Restoration Acts (RFRAs). Many RFRAs are written or conceived by conservative think tanks, rather than the legislators themselves.

Because RFRAs and policies like it are often installed as a reactive measure to a perceived ethical or moral dilemma, it creates new ethical problems and dilemmas where there might not have been a problem or moral dilemma to begin with. All public servants are sworn to do their duty "impartially" and "to the best of their ability" as per United States Code, Title 28, Part III, Chapter 57, §951, Oath of Office Clerks and Deputies. Public Servants are bound by their oath, requesting accommodations is tantamount to dereliction and abandonment of a sworn duty.

Speakers
avatar for Kourt Osborn

Kourt Osborn

Event Coordinator, Southern Utah University
I'm a Grad student. I'm an historian. I'm a philosopher.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am MDT
ED 215
  Community Engagement

9:00am MDT

Student Internship Student/Staff Collaborations in Community Development Campus-Based LGBTQIA+ Activism
In this presentation the authors (two internship students and a staff member) present the narrative of our collaborative LGBTQIA+ campus community development work through the internship relationship. We discuss the importance of disrupting hierarchical academic relationships in sustainable social justice work and present qualitative evaluative data from The Southern Utah University (SUU) LGBTQIA+ Allies on Campus B.W. Bastian Foundation Film Festival.

The Film Festival data indicates that intersectional and diverse belonging and representation is vital in creating progressive campus culture shifts. We assert that to successfully do this work across differences of subjectivity and social location (identity, power and role) relies on commitment to new ways of doing traditional academic processes such as student internship.

We discuss how the SUU LGBTQIA+ Allies On Campus B.W. Bastian Foundation Film Festival amplifies and grows progressive equity-based student services and supported educational attainment through arts-centered outreach. We recount the Film Festival administrative, program development and evaluative processes. We introduce and amplify the work of SUU LGBTQIA+ Allies on Campus, a committee comprised of SUU students, staff, and faculty dedicated to creating safe spaces for Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender, Queer individuals and Allies on the campus of Southern Utah University. We examine how partnering with The B.W. Bastian Foundation, in combination with campus initiatives and programs that emphasize the importance of intersectional recognition and belonging through social justice-based connections, have supported expansion and diversification of the committed work done by SUU LGBTQIA+ Allies on Campus.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am MDT
BUS 242
  Community Engagement

9:00am MDT

That's All
The process of creating my work was inspired by everything that I have done at SUU. I have choreographed several times for various performances on campus and turned to a variety of sources for inspiration. This year, being my senior year, I wanted to reflect on all of the work I have done during my time at SUU, how it has made me feel, where I have struggled, and what it all would encourage me to make here and now. My very first idea was one of explosion and cacophony, but while working with my dancers and establishing movement phrases, I realized all I wanted to do was laugh and enjoy myself while watching the piece I had created. The dancers played a significant role in the creation of the work because their personalities truly shine through. I needed dancers who were willing to laugh at themselves and make the audience laugh by committing to the obscurity we created. I can honestly say this is the first piece I’ve created that I love and feel genuinely connected too! While it might not clearly convey specific experiences, it does say what I needed it to say: art has a place even if it’s wild. I am grateful that my professors saw the work and potential of my piece and chose to have it represent SUU at such a prestigious conference as ACDA.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am MDT
MC 116

9:00am MDT

“How Could a Woman Do It?”: Animal Materiality in the Taxidermy of Martha Maxwell
American naturalist and taxidermist Martha Maxwell became famous in the 1870s for her skill and expertise in collecting and preserving specimens of Colorado’s wildlife. Despite her notoriety in the late nineteenth century, Maxwell is virtually unknown today. Her work and the accompanying 1879 book describing it, On the Plains and Among the Peaks; or, How Mrs. Maxwell Made Her Natural History Collection, provide a fascinating case study of how women practiced natural history and taxidermy.

My presentation considers the ways in which Maxwell’s female identity and body are intertwined with and shaped by the animal bodies of her taxidermy. In encountering nonhuman animals and materially altering them to create taxidermy, Maxwell increases her visibility as a woman and reveals the ways in which humans’ construction of natural and scientific knowledge is entangled with animal bodies, both living and dead. Furthermore, the book On the Plains, and Among the Peaks, which was written by Maxwell’s sister Mary Dartt, blends the violent, shifting corporeality of animal taxidermy with feminized sentimentality, which, in turn, highlights the tensions inherent in taxidermy between aesthetics and ethics.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am MDT
BUS 246
  Creative Expression & Analysis

9:00am MDT

Bringing a Brand to Life: How Four Students Helped a Local Business Establish a New Identity
During their branding class, four graphic design students worked with the owner of Pisco Peruvian Cuisine to make the restaurant's brand identity match its high-quality food. The process included creating four unique visual identities, conducting a photoshoot of nine dishes, designing new menus, updating interior and exterior signage, and building a contemporary website. In this presentation, the designers discuss their individual creative processes and how they worked together to create a unified look.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am MDT
BUS 244

9:00am MDT

. . . And Then What Happened? A Narrative Study of the Perceived Effects of London's West End Live Theatre Productions on SUU Study Abroad Students
The present research is a study of London’s West End Theatre productions and the perceived effects they have on SUU in London Study Abroad students. The research took place in London from May 9, 2018 to May 19, 2018 and consisted of viewing six plays and musicals including Matilda, Mousetrap, Wicked, Young Frankenstein, Hamlet, and A Comedy About a Bank Robbery. Each participant was given a questionnaire consisting of three questions relating to their thoughts and feelings about the productions. These questionnaires were submitted to me within 12 hours of seeing the play so that the responses would be immediate, fresh, and accurate. The participants were asked to not identify themselves in order to elicit more honest responses. Post-trip interviews were held two to three weeks after our return from London in order to assess the latent effects of the plays on the participants. The topics discussed were similar to those on the questionnaire but more detailed in nature.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am MDT
ED 204
  Global Engagement

9:00am MDT

Aluminum Foam
This presentation covers the properties and applications of aluminum foam. Specifically in the applications of compression for automobile collisions and sound dampening for jet turbines.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am MDT
BUS 243
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

9:00am MDT

The Violent Linguist: The Establishment of Control through Vernacular in Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange
This essay focuses on the particular use of vernacular in Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange and how it is utilized in order to conform the audience into being reliant on Alex deLarge. Alex deLarge, however, is a rapist, murderer, and sociopath. Nadsat, the vernacular of the world of A Clockwork Orange which is specifically demonstrated by Alex, is strange and unfamiliar in its language, as is the world of the film. Because of this, the first person narration done by Alex remains as the only introduction into the world. The audience then becomes reliant on Alex for understanding of the world, and thereby develops sympathy for a sociopath.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am MDT
BUS 120

9:00am MDT

Applications of Drone and Ground-Based Photogrammetry in Geoscience Research in Southern Utah.
Three-dimensional analysis of geologic structures and terrains using aerial and ground-based photogrammetry techniques is revolutionizing the geosciences. With the drastic increase in affordable unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV’s), high-resolution photogrammetry software, and survey grade GPS instruments, three dimensional documentation and analysis is beginning to replace some traditional field methods. We use UAV’s in southern Utah for a variety of geoscience projects including Quaternary landslide assessment, structural geology studies, stratigraphic architecture, and stream channel analysis. Drones have allowed us to study and access remote locations and cliff outcrops that were previously inaccessible. Once drone or ground-based data is collected, images are processed using a variety of open-source or professional photogrammetry products. In recent years, a variety of software’s have been developed to visualize and analyze three-dimensional models. In addition to three-dimensional models, photogrammetry software’s have a host of outputs including digital terrain models (dtm), digital surface models (dsm), and orthomosaics. Advances in machine learning have enabled automatic point-cloud classification, which allows for calculation of feature type abundance and enhanced imagery analysis.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am MDT
ED 102

9:00am MDT

General Chemistry Practicum: Assessing Skills as well as Knowledge
During the first year general chemistry course, students develop essential skills that allow them to be successful in future laboratory courses. It also helps them have concrete examples for specific processes that are discussed in various science courses throughout their educational and professional career. In an attempt to help students realize the depth of the knowledge that they have obtained, the second semester general chemistry lab added an individual practicum to help reinforce the importance of the skills gained from these lab courses. The evolution of this assessment will be discussed, as well as the relative success in terms of improved student performance.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Eves

Daniel Eves

Assistant Professor, Southern Utah Univesity
I enjoy teaching chemistry at the university level.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am MDT
ED 202
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

9:00am MDT

“Does increased online interaction between instructors and students positively affect a student’s perception of quality for an online course?”
Online education is increasing as a solution to manage increasing enrollment numbers at higher education institutions. Intentionally and thoughtfully constructed courses allow students to improve performance through practice and self-assessment and instructors benefit from improving consistency in providing content and assessing process, performance, and progress. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of student to instructor interaction on the student’s perception of quality for an online course. “Does increased online interaction between instructors and students positively affect a student’s perception of quality for an online course?” The study included over 1200 courses over a three year time period in a public, degree-granting higher education institution. The top two findings of the case study included an overall linear relationship between interactions per student and overall perception of quality in addition to a statistically significant relationship between interactions per student and quality-of-course scoring by students using linear regression with fixed effects for colleges. These findings were significant at the 99% level. The implications resulting from this study, based on the data, can be used by administrators and faculty to create high-quality online courses providing students a sense of belonging in an online learning environment.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am MDT
ED 111
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

9:00am MDT

15-Minute Hairspray
For our final in our Acting I class, we were assigned a broadway musical and expected to cut it down until it was fifteen minutes in length, while maintaining the integrity and message of the original piece. We were assigned the musical “Hairspray”, which is about body confidence and facing adversity in difficult times. One of the larger themes of the show is racism in 1960’s America. Since only one actor in our cast is an person of color, we altered the script to reflect another challenging circumstance: the inequality of The Queer community. Certain words and phrases were rewritten to better suit our cast, while still telling an important story. The characters of Seaweed and Lil’ Inez were combined and their arc was altered from the struggles of being Black to the struggles of being Transgender. Tracy was played by a man, making the romance between Tracy and Link gay. Most of the cast identifies under the Queer umbrella. The reason we changed the pivotal conflict of the show was to avoid appropriating cultures that were not our own, or portraying ourselves as races we are not. We wanted to spread a message of acceptance and self-love while avoiding insensitivity. This has been described as the best fifteen-minute musical ever performed in all thirteen years since this project was introduced.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:20am MDT
MU - Thorley Recital Hall
  Creative Expression & Analysis

9:00am MDT

Practitioner Research: Putting Educators in Charge of Educational Research
Traditionally, educational research was conducted by "researchers", who passed along their findings to schools and educators. This often results in general programs and practices that don't fit well in specific classrooms. In contrast, the field of Action Research places the research focus on an individual practitioner's school and classroom, with the educator in the role of researcher. SUU's M.Ed. capstone activity is a practitioner research project, which requires teachers to plan, carry out, and write up an investigation into a question of professional and personal interest. This inquiry promotes qualities associated with professional learning and teacher leadership, include increased self-efficacy, advocacy, collaboration, and optimism--what Greenfield (2015) calls "protective factors". Such teachers tend to remain in teaching longer and can advocate for their students using authentic research-based practices. Two teachers completing their research projects will share insights into the practitioner research process. One is from a larger, suburban district and the other from a more rural district. Each will offer a summary of their actual project as well as a meta-perspective on the practitioner research process. Attendees will understand the potential of practitioner research for developing teacher leaders. Rather than looking at teacher development from an "outside-->in" perspective, practitioner research offers an "inside-->out" approach where teachers organically benefit from investigating local questions of professional interest.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:35am MDT
ED 103
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

9:00am MDT

Hispanic Sociolinguistics Research: A class experience
In this panel we will present an experience we had as a class conducting Sociolinguistic Research. Students in this class designed and carried out an original study in which it analyzed the use of familiar address forms in Spanish, specifically, the use of ‘voseo’ versus ‘tuteo’, that is, using the pronominal form ‘vos’ (you-informal) as opposed to ‘tú’ (you-informal) among speakers of Spanish varieties where those forms are used. Previous studies (Hernández 2007, Fernández-Mallat 2018, Angulo 2010) found differences in the level of familiarity and intimacy attached to the use of both forms. Considering these results, the study explored the correlation between social factors such as gender, age, educational level and the relationship between the interlocutors and their impact on the choice of either vos or tú by the participants. During the panel we will discuss the experience of both students and professor, presenting the class structure and goals, the research process and its results as well as individual experiences of students conducting the analysis.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:55am MDT
ED 203
  Global Engagement

9:00am MDT

What is financial excellence and how do we achieve it?
Many SUU students start their collegiate journeys deeply impacted by the Great Recession where they witnessed, first hand, the impact of a stagnant and unrestrained debt economy. While holding this debt-consciousness, students may also struggle to anticipate expenses; track and monitor their spending; or understand the difference between good and bad credit. College is the perfect time to develop the knowledge, skills, and behaviors students will need to create a stable future, yet financial struggles are the number one reason students leave SUU.

SUU’s Financial Wellness Team is dedicated to facilitating a campus-wide shift in addressing financial illiteracy by promoting a culture of financial well-being through providing students and families with the financial tools needed to succeed in their academics and beyond. We are excited to share moving stories of students who have taken control of their debt, tips and tricks on how to manage your own finances and our vision for SUU to become a financially savvy campus. We’ll share data from our first year of financial wellness counseling, the latest research on wealth psychology, and real student examples of financial success and struggle. Panel presenters will include Ashleigh Zimmerman and Jayson Matlock, Financial Wellness Coordinators for current and prospective students at SUU, Maggie Bradford, a SUU Junior who is completing an internship in Financial Wellness during the Spring 2018 semester and Markiece Gross, a senior at SUU who has recently taken control of his finances through working with the financial wellness program.

Speakers
avatar for Ashleigh Zimmerman

Ashleigh Zimmerman

Ashleigh Zimmerman has served as Southern Utah University’s Coordinator for Financial Literacy and Completion since the Fall of 2018. Prior to this position, Ashleigh taught financial literacy for students at the KIPP Washington Heights Middle School in New York City. Before moving... Read More →


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:55am MDT
BUS 126

9:00am MDT

Roundtable Discussion on Teaching Challenging Topics
This roundtable, faculty-led discussion will explore effective techniques and strategies for introducing students to challenging and controversial themes. How do we deal with pushback when dealing with topics such as human evolution, climate change, racism, the social construction of gender, structural inequalities, and religious diversity that may challenge students' existing worldviews? How can we practice compassionate pedagogies as we introduce students to ideas and materials that may cause some of them to feel uncomfortable or defensive?


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 9:55am MDT
ED 104

9:00am MDT

Building a Brand: SUU Community Education
Launched in 2017, the Office of Community & Academic Enrichment (CAE) at SUU was charged with bringing back community education programs that had ceased operations four years previously.
To gauge attitudes and interests of the community, CAE administered a community survey between September and October 2017 following the hiring of new director Melynda Thorpe. Results provide insight into demographic characteristics of local residents and adult interest in elective learning opportunities associated with SUU. The survey serves as a foundation for building SUU’s community program offerings and a benchmark for measuring growth and progress.
It is a goal of our initial strategic plan to repeat the CAE community survey annually, matching its original administration conditions as near initial circumstances as possible: conduct during August-September, gain approximately 300 responses, administer at CAE-sponsored community event, Iron County Fair booth, Heritage Center cultural performance event and online via Facebook.
Between Sept. and Oct. 2018, another community survey was given to residents in the same locations. At the SUU Festival of Excellence, we would like to present the comparisons of the two surveys, present our findings on what worked, and didn’t, using our strategic marketing plan, and share some of our ideas successes with potential marketing students. Classes began in March 2018, and our first year goal was to have 300 students register in community education in 2018 — we had 504. In Jan. 2019, we have already had 250 sign up, half of our whole total from last year in one month. We hope to share some of these strategic marketing matrix successes and inspire others who might share the same interests in marketing.

Speakers
avatar for Haven Scott

Haven Scott

Media Relations, SUU Office of Community and Academic Enrichment
Media promotion for SUU CAE programs, SUU Community Education, SUU Professional Development, SUU Community on the Go, SUU Summer Experience and Road Creek Inn, SUU's field station near Capitol Reef National Monument.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 3:55pm MDT
ED - Lobby
  Community Engagement

9:00am MDT

BioBot
Ever since I was little, the idea of technology, the future, and space always fascinated me. Especially the world of robotics, which is what the Biobot is based on. This project bridges the gap between fantasy and reality. The purpose of the Biobot, is to help in ways that can be beneficial to the world and in our everyday lives. The inspiration behind it, comes from a genre known as Mecha anime.The plans for this project is to design and build a robot. More specifically a robot that can be operated by anyone, no matter who they are. Robots like these are known as Mechs. These robots are designed to complete tasks quickly and more effectively then the average machines we see everyday. Tasks such as construction, saving lives in global natural disasters, recreational purposes, and much more. By using a CAD software known as Solid-Works, I was able to design a machine that does exactly that. Adding another step towards new technological advancement and human evolution.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 3:55pm MDT
LIB - Lobby

9:00am MDT

Demarcation: A survey of Contemporary Photography in Utah
LIMITED EDITION PORTFOLIO
A Survey of Contemporary Photography in Utah

Edition of 35, 17 x 22 inches

Curated by Amy Jorgensen and Edward Bateman with included critical essays. Portfolio box, letterpress printed title, index and essay pages created in collaboration with Red Butte Press at the University of Utah, distributed by Granary Arts.

DE | MARCATION was originally conceived by Amy Jorgensen to support the unique vision of artists in the state of Utah and to build on the rich discourse of image making in the region.

Early photographic surveys of the American West explored the physical territory; this portfolio examines the conceptual landscape of creative practice by photographic artists spanning the vast spaces of Utah. The artists have strong connections to the state and their images represent a diversity beyond geographic boundaries; they interrupt convention and draw new lines. Intended to serve as a document of a historical moment, this portfolio was created as
an act of generosity, especially through its inclusion of a younger generation of artists who represent not only the current state of photographic art, but also its future.

Included Artists: Kimberly Anderson, Christine Baczek, David Baddley, Edward Bateman, David Brothers, Van Chu, Samuel Davis, Daniel George, Haynes Goodsell, Mark Hedengren, Amy Jorgensen, Natalie Kirk, Karalee Kuchar, Carsten Meier, Bernard C. Meyers, Andrew Patteson, Kim Raff, Nancy E. Rivera, Fazilat Soukhakian, Josh Winegar

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 3:55pm MDT
MA - SUMA
  Creative Expression & Analysis

9:00am MDT

Longing Love
This was a piece that was done during a live model session. It was my first try at Conte with two different colors. I used sanguine and black with sanguine being the primary color. I started off by erasing out the highlights and finding the models figure and just taking the first hour and a half to really study her. I then went back and added in the sanguine conte. This was a strange and challenging transition. Going from highlights to dark was hard, but just knowing that there was the possibility of ruining the work was harder to wrap around in my head. Once the sanguine was put down I touched up the darkest, most contrasted areas with the black conte pencil.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 3:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Creative Expression & Analysis

9:00am MDT

Judging the 2018 Melbourne Marimba Competition
This display presentation is to fulfill my requirements for the Faculty grant I received last year for travel to judge an international Marimba Competition in Melbourne, Australia. I was invited to be the first American judge for this music competition. I judged the competition, played a concert and give masterclasses in Melbourne and Brisbane, Australia.

Speakers
avatar for Lynn Vartan

Lynn Vartan

Director, A.P.E.X. Events, SUU
For more about me check out: www.lynnvartan.com Thanks! Looking forward to meeting everyone!


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 3:55pm MDT
ED - Lobby
  Global Engagement

9:00am MDT

College of Science and Engineering Makerspace
To help excel students in both hands-on and learning based knowledge, the College of Science and Engineering has begun a project to allow students from all over campus access to tools and machines needed for personal/classroom projects. In what we've come to call the Makerspace, we've assembled a woodworking area (nearly complete) with all tools anyone would need for basic woodworking projects, a composite area (nearly complete) with 3D and laser printers open for use, and a future metal working station that can be used for things such as bending, welding, etc... As this space is now ready for use, we'd like to get the word out to students who would like the opportunity to come and work on projects, as well as help us make this space a reality.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:00am - 3:55pm MDT
BUS - Lobby

9:10am MDT

Festival of Excellence: Celebrating Academic and Creative Scholarship
Each April, Southern Utah University hosts a campus-wide all-day event celebrating the academic and creative scholarship conducted by members of the campus community. In the span of a single day, members of our campus community have the opportunity to engage with more than 350 different presentations with topics ranging from nanoparticle fabrication and set theory to jazz dance and Shakespeare. But an event such as this doesn't happen on its own. It requires hard work and dedication from faculty, staff, and students all over the university.
Learn about the history of this annual event and how members of our campus community make this event happen.

Speakers
avatar for Jacob Ward

Jacob Ward

Co-Director, Festival of Excellence, Southern Utah University


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:10am - 9:17am MDT
ST - Kolob Canyon Living Room

9:20am MDT

Custom fit genes: Creating novel Open Educational Resources as an educational practice in a genetics course
Open Educational Resources (OERs) are freely accessible resources for teaching about any subject, but their power can be maximized when students themselves help to develop them. The process of students creating new OERs is an Open Educational Practice (OEP), a powerful tool for engaged learning. During Spring semester of 2019, I integrated Open Educational Practices (OEPs) into my Genetics Lecture (BIOL 3060) course by asking students to create an OER.

I challenged students to develop a resource that fulfills a particular educational need in the field of genetics. Their goal was to create a resource that addresses this need and that will be freely available to others outside of the course. Students formed groups in class, brain-stormed ideas for projects, and made preliminary plans. They then developed a proposal outlining their plans for their OER, including what need it fulfills, and who the audience is. After intermediate feedback, they will present their projects at the end of the semester, report on how it accomplished their goals, and publish the OER on a course website, in addition to any other venue with special relevance to the project.

The OEP approach is designed to foster deep thinking about communication, craftsmanship, and current usefulness instead of storing away facts for future use. The goal of this project is to fulfill real needs and spur students to teach real concepts to real people. Instead of assignments intended only for the instructor, this type of project provides a tangible benefit to a targeted audience via the internet. The intended result is student ownership, confidence, and generally deeper engagement in education.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:20am - 9:27am MDT
ST - Kolob Canyon Living Room

9:20am MDT

Developing Personal Identity in a Conflicting Modern Society
We are often a result of experiences had with our surroundings. Whether we follow the example of our parents, mentors or peers, or we make decisions based off of society or personal moral, we develop identity primarily by our desires, thoughts, feelings, and actions.
Whether we recognize it or not, many of our decisions are based off of society. I am afraid to admit that I too, make decisions that please society or that meet the common expectation (regardless if it be morally right or wrong). I still wonder whether I chose to serve a mission for myself, or if I felt inclined to serve because it is encouraged of the youth in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Am I currently attending college because I feel I need a degree to thrive, or because society tells me I must go to college in today's world to survive?
As we seek to learn who we truly are, do we lose ourselves trying to satisfy the demands of social expectations?

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:20am - 9:35am MDT
BUS 242
  Community Engagement

9:20am MDT

Drag Race: Transgender Identity in Polynesia
The idea that there is a 3rd gender assignment confuses some westerners. The label that is so frequently associated with transsexuals relegates them to the fringes of societal norms and has pushed them to the shadiest corners of normalcy. They are often hidden from public view by family members because of the shame of sexual and gender identity. By its definition, we have a difficult time dealing with those who identify as transgender simply because they do not fit into the construct society has built – you’re either male or female. But for many Polynesians, this reference is deeply rooted in cultural, social and sometimes spiritual origins. In Tonga they are called fakaleiti. In Hawaii they are referred to as mahu. The Samoans know them as fa’afafine and the Tahitians use the term rae rae. Those of the 3rd sex often held positions of high rank and maintained significant influence in the daily running of their communities. They were regarded as treasures, keepers of knowledge of customs, traditions and were arguably, some of the most creative and talented members of their communities. However in Polynesia, they are celebrated not only for their grace and beauty, but most particularly because of their efforts to preserve and perpetuate cultural values and indigenous art forms. Their life experience is part of the human experience and is no less vital to the everyday comings and goings of daily life than any other member of the community.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:20am - 9:35am MDT
ED 215
  Community Engagement

9:20am MDT

Jose Limón's "Chaconne" (excerpts & movement research)
Jose Limón was one of Modern Dance's foremost pioneers. His movement vocabulary, developed in tangent with Dorris Humphrey, solidified his legacy which still lives through his company in New York City. I recently had the opportunity to conduct movement research with the company attending technique classes, engaging discussion of performance techniques, and learning repertoire. What you will see today is excerpts from his iconic work "Chaconne", along with other movement ideas presented and researched at the event. Music is Johann Sebastian Bach's "Chaconne".

Speakers
avatar for Nick Blaylock

Nick Blaylock

Faculty, Mem., Southern Utah University
Nick Blaylock (he/him/his) is a dance artist and MFA graduate of the Modern Dance Program in the University of Utah’s School of Dance. Nick has performed nationally, and his creative research has been commissioned throughout the United States by studios, pre-professional companies... Read More →


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:20am - 9:35am MDT
MC 116
  Creative Expression & Analysis

9:20am MDT

“Dark Matter”: Science as Metaphor in the Poetry of Jared Carter
In his landmark book Science and Poetry (1926), I.A. Richards argues that poetry depends upon “The Magical View” of the Universe, premised upon belief in Spirits, Inspiration, and the Efficacy of Ritual. But Richards asserts that the scientific outlook is incompatible with “the Magical View” and therefore its cultural ascendance may mean the end of poetry. Many poets—including Blake, Keats, Whitman, and Poe indeed have identified science as a desiccating threat to poetic vision. Even the skeptic Hardy surprisingly leaves science behind to draw the Magical View into his poetry. But in the poetry of American poet Jared Carter we see an astonishing re-imagining of science, one that brings the Magical View into science by re-imagining key scientific concepts (such as the Big Bang and Cosmic Inflation) metaphorically. This re-imagining transforms science, making it not a threat to poetry but rather an imaginative resource for its creation. A careful analysis of Carter’s sonnet “Dark Matter” reveals how Carter effects this transformation in a way that sustains the Magical View by connecting with religious faith. Carter’s hopeful metaphoric perspective on science contrasts sharply with that of Albert Camus, who interprets science as metaphor only to identify it as an epistemological cul-de-sac in an absurd universe. But Carter’s hopeful metaphoric re-visioning of science harmonizes quite well with the way scientists such as Isaac Newton, Owen Gingerich, Alister McGrath, and Freeman Dyson have harmonized science with the transcendent. In an increasingly scientific world, Carter’s metaphoric perspective offers a promising future for poetry.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:20am - 9:35am MDT
BUS 246
  Creative Expression & Analysis

9:20am MDT

Racial Stereotypes in The Joy Luck Club and Changes in Modern China
A lot of Chinese American culture and literature taught in classes draw materials from works of the 19th and 20th centuries. Amy Tan’s novel The Joy Luck Club undoubtedly occupies a representative position. However, some racial stereotypes in the novel, which lack cultural context and are outdated, has caused division, misunderstanding, or even distortion of Chinese culture.



Amy Tan examines the lives of four pairs of mothers and daughters in America. All mothers had some life-changing experiences before they emigrated to America. However, the daughters were born in America and were all exposed to western ideals and values. The conflicts between mothers and daughters, Chinese culture and American culture are rising day by day. As a result, foreign readers tend to regard China as a country of paternalism, sex discrimination and patriarchy, regardless of the efforts Chinese government and its people have made under the increasing globalization.



As a Chinese student in America, I found it surprising to see the outdated representation of China in literary works, which might only apply to the 70’s. To view the old rules, regulations, and stereotypes in Chinese American literature with comprehension and objectivity, foreign readers must therefore understand the cultural background and current national conditions in China. Based on my personal experience, this paper discusses racial stereotypes in terms of mother-daughter relationship, sex discrimination and marriage in The Joy Luck Club. It also explores the current situation in China, where women’s status, parenting, and marriage all have undergone great changes, which lead to more harmonious relationship and happier lives. How do these racial stereotypes affect foreign readers? Why there is little up-to-date portrayal of modern China in Chinese American literature? Why not choose contemporary work like Fresh off the Boat: A Memoir to perceive Chinese culture?

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:20am - 9:35am MDT
ED 204
  Global Engagement

9:20am MDT

A Functional Analysis of the 2016 American Presidential Debates
Presidential debates provide a national platform for candidates to put forth their message to the American public, debate with other candidates onstage and gain the approval of voters. Widely considered to be an unusual election year, the 2016 presidential race necessitates rigorous academic research. This study applies the Functional theory of Political Campaign Discourse to examine the rhetoric of the 2016 American Presidential debates. The purpose of this research was to see whether or not the 2016 presidential candidates’ rhetoric used during debates conformed to previous election cycle’s debates. The use of The Functional Theory of Political Campaign Discourse allowed the researcher to identify the patterns of political debate rhetoric and analyze the communication functions used by each Presidential candidate. A content analysis of the 2016 debates’ rhetoric was performed on a random sample of half of the total debates that occurred during the election. The sample included debates from both the Democratic and Republican primaries, as well as one from the general election. Limitations of the current research and possible routes for future research are discussed.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:20am - 9:35am MDT
BUS 243

9:20am MDT

Neural Network Application in Detecting Breast Cancer by Removing Outliers
Artificial Intelligence approaches have been one of the most widely used tools for prediction and classification in many fields for cases where we use deductive reasoning. Specifically, in the medical field, artificial intelligence and neural networks have been used for diagnosing patients by using pattern recognition, prediction, and classification methods. Among many medical applications, the classification of breast cancer has been one of the important topics for researchers. Finding a classification approach with high reliability and a low error within the testing data-set has been one of the greatest challenges among researchers and scientists.
One of the disadvantages of a neural network classifier is that it will be stuck at the local minimal unable to reach an accurate result due to possible outliers within data-set. This may happen if the data-set in use contains outliers which affect the proper convergence of the neural network.
To overcome this problem, the detection and removal of the outliers within the data-set is proposed. The objective of this study is to use the neural network classification to diagnose breast cancer for the data-set after eliminating outliers. This can be used for normal diagnosis of cancer without considering special cases. Our approach uses the UCI data-set by implementing the neural network and detecting and removing the outliers. We run the neural network on the remaining data-set to test the performance of the classifier.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:20am - 9:35am MDT
BUS 120
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

9:20am MDT

SUCCESS Academy Research with the Great Basin Observatory
Southern Utah University is a founding partner in the Great Basin Observatory (GBO) project, which is located in Great Basin National Park. This observatory is well suited to research because of its excellent dark-sky location and robotic capabilities. Several student groups have completed research projects that have resulted in publications in peer-reviewed journals. As they completed these projects, students gain experience in actual scientific research and the process of science. Their publication also strengthens their applications as they progress in their academic careers. In this presentation, I will discuss the challenges and rewards of this research model, as well as future directions of SUU research at GBO.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:20am - 9:35am MDT
ED 111
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

9:20am MDT

Making Hate Moral: An Investigation of the Interplay between Hate Speech and Moral Licensing on a Rural and Predominantly White College Campus
Hateful speech can hurt minorities and impair academic performance. In this research, in order for speech to be classified as hateful, it must meet a two prong test: It silences the victim, preventing them from participating in any kind of discourse, and demeans them strictly on the basis of a legally recognized protected class. Some individuals may unwittingly engage in hateful speech due to the effect of moral licensing. Moral licensing is rationalizing present bad deeds on the basis of past good deeds. This may be moderated by moral development, and the research will include methods to measure participants’ moral development. Moral licensing can be observed in a variety of different contexts, such as voting behaviors, racial bias, and economic altruism. A substantial body of research has accumulated to support the concept that moral licensing contributes to biased attitudes. However, there is currently no literature on the combination of hate speech and moral licensing, so this study will illuminates a previous blind spot in the moral licensing literature. This research seeks to understand how the type of moral license and moral development affects the perception of hate speech. Furthermore, the research will examine how the level of moral development predicts moral licensing behavior.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:20am - 9:35am MDT
BUS 238

9:20am MDT

Investigating the Light-Absorbing Properties of Dipyrroles common to Bilins
Pigments in plants give us a wide variety of color. They are very beautiful at times, but also serve a more practical purpose for the plants. The dark green visible in almost all plants and algae serve the purpose of collecting light for photosynthetic processes. These green pigments are made of certain molecules called tetrapyrroles. In this project we aim to dissect a certain tetrapyrrole that forms bilins (commonly found in algae) and observe the light absorbing properties of a smaller “building block” that forms this pyrrole chain called a dipyrrole. We will perform NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, and IR spectroscopy on said dipyrrole compound, in conjunction with previous found data, to discover the light-absorbing properties in order to help us more fully understand what makes the larger natural pigment so efficient at capturing sunlight.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:20am - 9:35am MDT
ED 102

9:20am MDT

Spatial Storytelling: Using GIS to Enhance Social Studies Education
The human story has been told and retold from the perspective of multiple and ever-changing lenses. With advances in geospatial technology, this story can now be told with a perspective previously unexplored in social studies education. Project Archaeology, a not-for-profit, national heritage education program, is currently working on a curriculum that will allow students to use the Geographic Information System (GIS) to explore the history of human migration. While an extensive collection of human migration modules is planned, the first module addresses the push and pull factors that affected use of the Overland Trail. In this pilot investigation, students take a journey with the Franklin Adams family, reading journals, analyzing photographs and historic maps, and using GIS tools to gain new perspectives. This innovative K12 curriculum will be published and made accessible to educators nationwide.

Speakers
avatar for Samantha Kirkley

Samantha Kirkley

Coordinator of Utah Project Archaeology, Southern Utah University
Project Archaeology is a not-for-profit national heritage education program. Archaeologists, museum educators, k12 educators, indigenous educators, and others have callaborated for over 25 years to develop relevant, engaging, multidisciplinary K12 curriculum. While curriculum writing... Read More →


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:20am - 9:35am MDT
ED 202
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

9:20am MDT

View from the Tech Booth: Remembering the Unappreciated
View from the Tech Booth: Remembering the Unappreciated is a series of poems that uses the concept of different personas to portray a "behind-the-scenes" perspective of the theater world. The poems are told in the voices of the theater tech-people whose presence is invisible yet vital to the success of a theater production--the dresser, the orchestra conductor, the house manager, the light tech, and so forth. The compilation of these voices creates a unique ensemble cast.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:20am - 9:55am MDT
BUS 244

9:25am MDT

Directing II 3-Minute Film Festival
This presentation is an opportunity for young directors to explore their craft in the medium of film. By employing basic film techniques, they are charged with creating a film narrative which incorporates a specific emotion, prop, soundtrack and genre. These presentations encourage the student directors to show their artistic leadership and creativity. The presentation highlights the top three film winners.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:25am - 9:55am MDT
MU - Thorley Recital Hall

9:30am MDT

The Art of Danish Hygge
hygge
h(y)o͞oɡə,ˈho͝oɡə
noun
a quality of coziness and comfortable conviviality that engenders a feeling of contentment or well-being (regarded as a defining characteristic of Danish culture).
"why not follow the Danish example and bring more hygge into your daily life?" (dictionary.com)

Hygge is a mindset that is embedded in Danish culture that, even though it is a good place to start, goes deeper than the definition given. Fuzzy socks, contemplation, baking, candles, wooden tables, cozy sweaters, good company, and warm faces are all ingredients that could be added to a perfect night of hygge. Living in a world that constantly presents endless streams of information often leads to unnecessary stress and noise. Anyone who has felt this way can greatly benefit from this underrated Danish lifestyle (and coming from the happiest country, we may want to take notes!).

I will be presenting on the art of hygge: what it is, what is feels like, why it matters, and how anyone can apply it to their life.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:30am - 9:37am MDT
ST - Kolob Canyon Living Room
  Global Engagement

9:40am MDT

Radio Mind
How the mind uses thoughts to create your life.

Each person lives a different life, but each of our minds functions in the same way. Radio Mind, is an explanation of how our mind works: the different parts that make it up, and an illustration to help understand it.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:40am - 9:47am MDT
ST - Kolob Canyon Living Room
  Leadership & Entrepreneurship

9:40am MDT

Examining Retention: Why do SUU students stay?
My research will be examining retention at Southern Utah University. Why do students at SUU stay? I will be conducting interviews with freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors to try to determine why students decide to stay at SUU.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:40am - 9:55am MDT
BUS 242
  Community Engagement

9:40am MDT

Examining the Lived Experiences of Native American Students at A Predominantly White Institution
This qualitative research study sought to examine the lived experiences and sense of belonging of Native American students at a mid-western, predominantly white institution. Three participants were each interviewed twice for data collection purposes. Findings from data analysis process indicated that establishing and maintaining relationships within the campus community facilitated a sense of belonging and that racial stereotypes and microaggression were present in the campus environment which often made participants feel hesitant to reveal their Native American identity. Participants noted a shift in the racial climate on campus following a social media video depicting a white supremacist on campus. Recommendations are offered for higher education professionals and areas for future research are noted. This research fulfilled the requirements of a Master's Thesis.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:40am - 9:55am MDT
ED 215
  Community Engagement

9:40am MDT

isn't
This dance work was a new exploration for me. Typically, when I create dance I go into the room with my dancers and use whatever stimulus or inspiration that comes to mind. This usually results in a big mess that somehow gets put together and placed on a stage. Though this method works, I decided to challenge my creative process and go into the studio with an entirely new idea. For this piece, I approached the process with a specific vision and with very specific movements. The end result shocked me, for I never thought I could create a dance work that is visually pleasing. My professor’s saw the potential within this piece, and with great honor, they’ve chosen this work to represent the university at the American College Dance Association. During this conference, I will be able to learn and get feedback from various dance professionals, this is very important to me because I can begin to get my name out in the dance world and make connections that will help me transition from my journey as a College Dancer to a Professional Dancer and Choreographer.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:40am - 9:55am MDT
MC 116
  Creative Expression & Analysis

9:40am MDT

Depeche Module: Information Literacy for Canvas Integration
The instruction librarians at the Gerald R. Sherratt Library have developed a suite of information literacy modules to help prepare students for their research assignments and presentations. These modules, ranging from “Creating a good research question” to “Using the Library databases” and “How to evaluate sources” may be imported from Canvas Commons and integrated into your courses as a way of augmenting pre-existing research skills, or as a refresher for students still unfamiliar with basic research skills. These modules exist as stand-alone tools that can be used in tandem with live in-class librarian instruction (see https://library.suu.edu/ILCanvas-modules), and may be utilized effectively in a flipped classroom or research-intensive settings. Through use of these modules in your online course or in the classroom covering basic skills, the door may be opened for developing additional high-impact information literacy skills.

Speakers
avatar for Anne R. Diekema

Anne R. Diekema

Assoc. Professor/Dept. Chair, Southern Utah University
Anne Diekema is Department Chair of the Library & Information Science department at Southern Utah University's Sherratt Library. Anne teaches information literacy and library research skills and studies how to best prepare students for information problem solving in school, profession... Read More →
avatar for Maralee Carlin

Maralee Carlin

Assistant Professor, Library & Information Science, Southern Utah University


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:40am - 9:55am MDT
BUS 243
  Digital & Information Literacy

9:40am MDT

A Blonde in China
Studying abroad = greatest adventure! I moved across the world to be immersed in Chinese culture and language. As I traveled across China, I found beauty and history everywhere I went. It's time to share my stories!

Speakers
avatar for Maura Knutsen

Maura Knutsen

I am a Sophomore at Southern Utah University, and loving it! My passions include: traveling, being in the outdoors, surrounding myself with friends and family, and of course... food! I have been fortunate enough to travel the world with my family, and love to share my stories, but... Read More →


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:40am - 9:55am MDT
ED 204
  Global Engagement

9:40am MDT

A Study of the Microbiome of a Helobdella Species
Blood-feeding leeches are generally thought to rely on bacterial symbionts to aid in the digestion of blood, the synthesis of vitamins from this low-nutrient food source, and for protection against pathogens. Aeromonas and a Rikenella-like bacterium have been identified as symbionts in the digestive tracts of medicinal leeches of the genus Hirudo [Family: Hirudinidae]. Bacterial species closely related to well-described insect symbionts, including Buchnera and Wigglesworthia are commonly found in the blood-feeding leeches of the Haementeria and Placobdelloides genera [Family: Glossiphoniidae]. However, the microbiomes of non-sanguivorous leeches including Helobdella modesta [Family: Glossiphoniidae] are currently unknown. Characterizing the microbiome of Helobdella modesta will provide a better understanding of the ecological roles of Helobdella modesta and of the genus’ evolutionary descent from the blood-feeding members of the Glossiphoniidae family. This report is the first to describe the isolation, characterization, and identification of bacteria within the microbiome of a Helobdella species.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:40am - 9:55am MDT
ED 102
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

9:40am MDT

Mathematical Models Arising in Math Biology and Chemistry
Some mathematical models used in population and environmental problems and in chemistry will be introduced. The existence, uniqueness, and the continuity of the solutions of those models will be discussed. Some problems in those models could be undergraduate research projects.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:40am - 9:55am MDT
ED 111
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

9:40am MDT

Microfluidics at SUU
Microfluidics are a multibillion dollar industry, and are still finding additional applications in medicine, forensics, diagnostics, chemistry, and biology. Microfluidics are particularly useful for measuring and fabricating materials. A new method to fabricate microfluidics has been developed at SUU. I will discuss this method and the applications we have developed for it.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:40am - 9:55am MDT
BUS 120
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

9:40am MDT

Wiping Out the Competition in PUBG Using Random Forest Analysis.
PUBG is a popular online game, with millions of players world wide. Using millions of observations, can you distinguish what player statistics separates winners from loosers. You can accomplish this by using mathematical models executed on a programming language known as r studio. For my analysis I will use an ensemble model consisting of unique random forests.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:40am - 9:55am MDT
ED 202
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

9:40am MDT

As the Smoke Clears: Discussing the Smoking Policy at Southern Utah University
This presentation analyzes my experience in leading the Tobacco-Free Campus (TFC) effort at Southern Utah University (SUU). Being a “Tobacco-Free Campus” or not has been and continues to be a conversation at SUU. After explaining the unique characteristics of the SUU community, I will highlight findings from two surveys administered at SUU (one to students and another faculty and staff) as well as analyze and interpret the survey results. The bulk of the presentation will be focused on theories of why adopting a Tobacco-Free policy has not happened at SUU, despite all the efforts to change the policy over the course of the last few years. This will be done by comparing SUU to other universities that have been successful in going Tobacco-Free and identifying the differences between them.  Also highlighted will be the common concerns and challenges that universities face when trying to adopt these policies as well as a discussion of what should be done to make a campus ready to adopt a Tobacco-Free policy. Special attention will be brought to the need for cessation, support and education to ensure that these policies are successful and beneficial to their community.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:40am - 9:55am MDT
BUS 238
  Leadership & Entrepreneurship

9:40am MDT

Understanding Trauma Informed Practices in the Classroom
According to the American Psychological Association (APA, 2015), trauma is an emotional response to a terrible event, which can lead to difficulties with emotional regulation, social relationships, and the development of physical symptoms. Traumatic experiences may include physical or sexual abuse, neglect, experiencing or witnessing violence, war, suicides, and disasters. When these traumatic events occur prior to the age of 18, researchers call them adverse childhood experiences, or ACEs. The Centers for Disease Control (Felitti et al. 1998) conducted a large scale study which found that roughly 64% of people experience at least one ACE and 22% of the population experiences three or more ACEs. The more ACEs a child has, the more likely they are to develop school-based academic and behavioral challenges, such as aggression, depression, inattention, anxiety, and delayed language and cognitive development (Lansford et al., 2002; Veltman & Browne, 2001). Knowing that students who exhibit problem behavior face higher rates of exclusionary discipline procedures, such as out-of-school suspension (Civil Rights Data Collection, 2014), it is imperative that K-12 schools utilize trauma-informed practices and employ trauma-informed (TI) teachers.

This presentation will discuss the ACEs framework and use of trauma-informed practices in classrooms at every level. Understanding trauma and utilizing these specific practices in the classroom is necessary to helping students find safety and success in school.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:40am - 10:15am MDT
ED 103
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

9:50am MDT

Pornography Isn't A Good Partner
In this speech, I will begin by discussing how pornography is viewed in our society and why we need to take this subject more seriously. This will lead into my next point of how viewing pornography can lead to a sexual addiction. Then I will bring up the harmful effects that pornography has on the viewer's brain, life and relationships. My closing statements will include how I have dated men and been friends with people who have had struggled with this addiction and how they have overcome that. How to start getting help and where to look for help in overcoming a pornography addiction will be apart of my closing statements.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 9:50am - 9:57am MDT
ST - Kolob Canyon Living Room

10:00am MDT

A Survey of Religiosity and Spirituality Among SUU Students
Research questions will focus on (1) the role, if any, that religion or spirituality plays among students at SUU, (2) whether the students believe the student body and faculty of SUU are tolerant of religious diversity, and (3) whether the students have personally changed from their religious or spiritual roots (strengthened, relaxed, diverged from, or left).



Expected outcomes and benefits include (1) student feedback regarding perceptions of religious/spiritual tolerance at SUU, (2) data for further tolerance/non-discrimination training, if necessary, and (3) the foundational research to use as a springboard for further study of student religious/spiritual thinking and perception.

Speakers
SD

Steve Decker

Cedar City Public Library


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
ED 215
  Community Engagement

10:00am MDT

Utah's Children's Justice Centers: What they do and how you can be involved
Last year, I had the wonderful opportunity to intern at the Iron County Children's Justice Center. Before my internship opportunity, I had no idea what children's justice centers were, but I quickly learned how important they are for our community. I want to present about my experience at the Center, and how we can help prevent child abuse in our community. I will be focusing on Utah Children's Justice Centers in general, but will speak specifically about my experiences at the Iron County Children's Justice Center.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
BUS 242
  Community Engagement

10:00am MDT

Dustin Pullman (BFA Exhibition, Graphic Design)
Really, this piece is not complicated in its intentions. This is an environmental graphic made up of a wooden, freestanding, box/frame and plastic sheets covered in printed illustrations. This piece is large, fun and meant to be enjoyable. It was designed around a statement/quote, providing a simple truth: you matter.

With this piece, I wanted to drift away from the common student examples of graphic work; and achieved this, through its construction, scale, meaning and overall design. It is both aesthetically pleasing, as well as a novelty; the use of an anaglyph color palette plays tricks on the viewer’s eyes and mind. Looking through the provided blue and red glasses, closing one eye at a time, will reveal both the message and the illustrations. It stands to provoke a form of motivation and inspiration, derived from personal battles I have had with self-purpose. Ultimately, it is a feel-good piece.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
MA - SUMA

10:00am MDT

The Performative Body: Emotion Science and Utopia in Performance
Affect is ill-defined. As a term employed in cognitive science, affective neuroscience, and performance studies it can variously mean an autonomic reaction, the interpretation of an autonomic reaction through cognition (defined as an emotion or feeling by many scholars), a sociocultural fold in which culture is experienced and performed, or even simply the ability of bodies to both be affected or to affect other bodies. All of these definitions share an interest in how our bodies impact our actions and thoughts; how the arousal of the body through interactions with environment, cognition, and other bodies “does.” Affect theory works on the performative potential of embodied experiences to grasp this murky process of doing. I propose an intersection between the falsifiable research of affect/emotion science and the performative theory of Jill Dolan’s Utopia in Performance to establish the benefits and possibilities of cognitive and affective science’s ability to explain affect and its impact in performance and theatre.

Outlining the dual history of the affective turn I argue for the use of affect/emotion science to understand theatre’s performative potential as a clearer and specific alternative to the more far-reaching affective theories based in Spinoza and following Deleuze and Guttari. Utilizing examples from plays like Sarah Kane’s Blasted and the Tectonic Theatre Project’s The Laramie Project in conversation with work on basic emotions I put forward a theory of performative affect focused on the two axes suggested by the James A Russell’s circumplex model of affect: valence (pleasure to displeasure) and arousal (arousal to sleep). This model allows for the complexities of affect/emotion to be understood as an interaction between cognition, physiological response, and the larger environment (social, cultural, and material circumstances), ultimately offering a way to understand the potential impact of affectively salient theatrical and performance experience.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Knowles

Scott Knowles

Director, Festival of Excellence


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
BUS 244
  Creative Expression & Analysis

10:00am MDT

You are What You Eat: I, Zombie, Passing, and the Role of Food in Modern Zombie Television
Typically, we think of “passing” as it relates to African Americans, largely in part because of Nella Larsen’s 1929 novel Passing. In Larsen’s novel, the character Clare Kendry “passes” as white to have greater access and autonomy, including a marriage to a white man, all with tragic results. I, Zombie and other zombie television have adapted this idea of “passing” as something other than one’s true identity for the zombie narrative. In I, Zombie, Seattle zombies typically “pass” through the use of hair dye, spray tans, and for Liv Moore – the main character, the disguising of her food. In later seasons, the desire to “pass” is lessened, at least in part. Liv, however, begins to “pass” more. She also embraces the idea of taking on the identity of the brains she eats to even more extreme measures by not just disguising the brains as food, but as food that the deceased would have liked. Historically, the zombie has representative of “the other,” but in I, Zombie most of the zombie characters are played by white actors and once they become zombies, their skin, hair, and eyes become even lighter. Now that zombies have become heroes; they have also become white. Another problem is that the zombies don’t just take on a physical identity, but they also enact a kind of personality theft of the deceased. While Liv uses this access to memories and personality to solve crimes, it also serves as a way for her to deny the reality of her life as a zombie. This willingness to sublimate her true identity mirrors the behaviors of Clare. This kind of passing is troubling because not only is Liv hiding her role as a zombie from others; in many ways, she is trying to hide it from herself.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
BUS 246
  Creative Expression & Analysis

10:00am MDT

Africa Adventure - SUU Study Abroad 2018
Six students and two faculty members traveled in Swaziland and South Africa in May 2018 for three weeks studying eco-tourism, travel photography and service learning. The group shot photos on more than a dozen photo safaris, visited many eco-tourism locations and provided service to orphanages and schools. The panel presentation will summarize their experiences.



Mentors: Anne Smith, Jon Smith

Speakers
avatar for Jon Smith

Jon Smith

Communication Professor, SUTV Southern Utah University
SUU Communication Professor


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
ED 204
  Global Engagement

10:00am MDT

Opera in the Bavarian Alps
Opera in the Bavarian Alps. What better place to study opera than in Europe? An opera performance and  a presentation of my experience abroad, what I learned, and the guidebook I have created to help future Vocal Performance majors prepare to study abroad. The presentation, in part, completes a Honors Capstone and EDGE Project.

Durch Zärtlichkeit und Schmeicheln from Die Entführung aus dem Serail
by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Claire Robinson, soprano
Tracey Bradshaw, piano



Speakers
avatar for Claire Robinson

Claire Robinson

Vocal Performance Major Opera Nerd Senior Honors Student


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
MU - Thorley Recital Hall

10:00am MDT

An Iterative Method of Determining Outliers
Typical methods of determining outliers use the mean and standard deviation. However, outliers themselves strongly influence the mean and standard deviation, especially for small data sets. I present an iterative method to better identify outliers.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
ED 202
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

10:00am MDT

Growth series for EDT0L languages
Lindenmayer systems (L-systems) were introduced in 1968 to model the growth processes of plant development. Since then L-systems have proven useful in chemistry, computer science, and mathematics. A distinguishing feature of L-systems is strictly parallel, rather than serial, growth.

Extended Deterministic Table 0-interaction Lindenmayer (EDT0L) grammars are a generic extension of L-systems that have found recent use in group theory. The languages generated by EDT0L grammars are a strict subset of the class of indexed languages. Nevertheless the class of EDT0L languages is robust and diverse.

In this presentation, I describe an algorithm to convert an unambiguous EDT0L grammar into an equivalent indexed grammar in order to compute the growth series for the generated language. Several examples will be shown.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
BUS 243
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

10:00am MDT

Mapping the Contours of Relationship Change and Stability in Divorce Ideation Over Time
Recent scholarship in the domain of commitment uncertainty (Owen et al., 2014), marital ambivalence (Hinson, Hargrave, Northrup, & Robertson, 2017), and divorce ideation (Allen & Hawkins 2017; Hawkins et al., 2017) suggest the importance of better understanding the dialectical tensions involved in navigating the liminal space of marital commitment uncertainty. In order to model complex relational processes of change over time however, researchers need to move beyond contextualized snapshots of relationship processes to a more continuous mapping of changes in emotions, beliefs, and actions collected at multiple points over time. This longitudinal qualitative research explores divorce ideation in order to not only gain a better understanding on how married partners make decisions about the future of their marriage over time, but to also propose better theoretical models designed to capture the dynamic processes of stability and change embedded within divorce ideation.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
BUS 126
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

10:00am MDT

The Diffusion of Maize to the American Southwest
My presentation will be looking at the archaeological record for the development and diffusion of maize from Mesoamerica to what is now the Southwestern United States. It will consist of a comparative analysis of the current prevailing theories as to when it arrived, what route it followed, and how it arrived to the Southwest.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
ED 102

10:00am MDT

Is Frederick Herzberg's Motivation/Hygiene Theory still relevant in 2019?
Frederick Herzberg was my Professor while I was an MBA student at the University of Utah. His research in the 1950's and 60's contributed a great deal to the Human Relations School of Management through his insights into the areas of employee satisfaction and motivation. According to the theory, hygiene factors are the extrinsic conditions, or environmental factors, that determine the satisfaction or dissatisfaction level of employees. Herzberg's theory states that, while negative hygiene factors (such as low pay, poor working conditions or lack of job security) cause job dissatisfaction, positive hygiene factors only satisfy basic employee needs, but do not increase motivation. Motivation factors are the positive influences that cause an employee to want to feel ownership. Extrinsic motivating factors (such as recognition, advancement and increasing levels of responsibility) and intrinsic motivating factors (such as achievement, growth and self actualization) are similar.

The question becomes, are employees in 2019 similar to those in Herzberg's early research or has the nature of employment changed in the past 60 years since the 1959 publication of The Motivation to Work?

Speakers
DD

David Dyches

Deputy Executive Director, SUU Aviation Department
I oversee the admin function for the Aviation Department. My work history is mostly in the HR portion of business. I graduated with an MBA from the University of Utah


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
BUS 238
  Leadership & Entrepreneurship

10:00am MDT

The Role of Religious Strain on Suicide Risk
The state of Utah falls within an area of the U.S. commonly referred to as the “Suicide Belt,” given the higher than average rate of suicide. Even though explanations for this above-average rate have been discussed colloquially and presented in suicide research, these explanations either fail to be supported by empirical data or they only minimally predict suicidal-related thoughts and behaviors, respectively. Religiousness tends to be one of these factors discussed both within and outside the academic realm as a contributing factor to suicide. However, the role of religiousness in suicidality tends to yield rather mixed results. We predicted that religious strain, one’s feelings associated with identifying with a religion, rather than actual religiousness would predict suicidal risk. Across two self-report, survey studies, we tested and found support for this hypothesis. More specifically, two factors of religious strain, religious discomfort and fear/guilt of God, most consistently predicted this risk. Furthermore, individuals identifying as a sexual-orientation minority (i.e., gay, lesbian, etc.) had significantly higher levels of reported religious strain and suicidal risk than heterosexual individuals.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
BUS 120

10:00am MDT

Design Principles for Educational Math Games
Educational games have a great potential to engage students and teach them mathematical skills and concepts in a fun way. However, for an educational game to be effective, the creation of the game should be guided by core design principles. This presentation will discuss some of these design principles, and illustrate them through demonstrations of several online educational math games.



This presentation is based on work done by Michael Renne, a PhD student at Oregon State University, as presented at the annual UMATYC Conference in October 2018.

Speakers
MA

Matt Adams

Assistant Professor, Southern Utah University


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
ED 104
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

10:00am MDT

Fostering Independence in a Child with Autism
We designed a family life education course to help parents with children with autism in their home to improve their behavior and functioning, in hope of a more independent future. This is a four week course for any person parenting a child with autism focusing on behavior management, child advocacy, importance of consistency, and improving social interactions. We believe that if parents are able to help their child in the home, they will do better in everyday interactions, in school, and in their future.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am MDT
ED 111
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

10:00am MDT

SEE ME! Dance Theatre
To consider dance and theatre as inseparable disciplines has always proved a valuable opportunity in training the performer in best embodiment and performance practices. As such, to situate my creative work within the space of “dance theatre” has felt logical, clear and reflective of my equal investment in embodied practices and valuing of text spoken on stage.

Most recently, the opportunity to approach work in this merger has enabled dancers to use text as a means to invest deeper in the technique of a dancer and find a voice, both literally and metaphorically that deeply informs their movement and transforms performance approaches for the dancer demanding to be heard.

This dance theater work, “BRAD”, was created as a collaborative process with a cast of seven exceptional dance theater artists and their experiences within and around the “mean girl” trope.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Crotty

Michael Crotty

UDEO Higher Ed Rep, Southern Utah University | UDEO
Michael Crotty is a dance artist and teacher from Springboro, OH. He received his Diploma from CODARTS Conservatory in the Netherlands.  He received an MFA in Modern Dance from The University of Utah. His interdisciplinary works explore the integration of queerness with literature... Read More →


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:45am MDT
MC 116

10:00am MDT

Service in the Mountains: Guatemala
My presentation will recount service I performed with Dr. Liz Olson and also the Cedar City Rotary Club in regions of Guatemala during May of 2018. We went to a few rural communities to help build earth stoves in village homes as well as provide medical care alongside some American medical staff. The trip lasted eleven days and we were able to build about 16 stoves and fund the completion of another three-hundred by the end of the next year.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Global Engagement

10:00am MDT

Spanish American Literature 20th-21st Century: Three Approaches
This panel presentation showcases exemplary student work from Spanish 4312 (Spring 2018). In this course, students analyzed and discussed the textual production in Spanish America from the beginning of the 20th century to our days. In this panel, students will approach the works of three of the most well-known and celebrated Latin American writers of this period—Julio Cortazar (Argentina), Horacio Quiroga(Uruguay) and Pablo Neruda (Chile)— in order to examine and consider the ways in which the sensible world is transformed and transfigured in their works as well as to identify the main textual resources they employ to achieve these effects.
This presentation will be conducted entirely in Spanish.

Panel Participants and Paper Titles:

Lo mágico y lo mundano en el mundo literario de Julio Cortázar– Peter Sorensen

Tono y terror: El rol de las descripciones en dos obras de Poe y Quiroga. – Kolton Elmer

¿Habla del comunismo o de un plato?: Vanguardia, política y la poesía de lo cotidiano en la obra de Pablo Neruda- Brock Chad Hunter


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
ED 203
  Global Engagement

10:00am MDT

Alcoholism and the Abuse of Other Drugs is Hereditary
To represent both sides of the debate. The argument has two sides, alcoholism is or isn't hereditary.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Attending childcare centers during the first three years of life is psychologically damaging to children
For this poster, we will be discussing both sides of how attending childcare centers during the first three years of life is psychologically damaging to children. Our goal is to show both sides of how attending childcare facilities at a young age is psychologically damaging. We have found research to present to help educate people on the effects children receive from attending childcare centers during their first three years of life.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Attending Childcare: Harmful or Helpful?
We will be presenting on both sides of the controversial topic of how childcare for children 2 years and under can be harmful or helpful for families. We will present our synthesis on research we found about the effects of childcare on young children and their families.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Children enrolled in high-quality preschools experience advanced social and cognitive development beyond that of preschoolers who remain at home
Why Advanced learning Preschools will bring the opportunity for greater success in the lives of those we love the most, our children. They will learn important mile stones that are critical in development as well as build on social and other cognitive skills. Also compare the result of staying at home.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Children with learning disabilities should be mainstreamed
Children with disabilities should be in the media and should a normal thing for people to deal with.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Children with learning disabilities should be mainstreamed
We will be presenting both sides of the controversial topic and we will then be giving our synthesis on the research we found together.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Customized InMoov humanoid robotic arm
This is a continuation of the InMoov Humanoid Robot project. However, it is a customized version specific to controlling the arm. Previous programming of the robot was controlled by Arduino, which was time consuming and more error prone. We are using Labview for programming and the NImyRio as the computer interface to control the arm. This is an opportunity for students interface other methods in controlling robotic functions and fine tune designs to work more efficiently. This project gives students experience in redesign and reprogramming techniques. The robot parts were fabricated by utilizing the CAD/CAM departments’ 3-D printer, as well as other printers that were made available by former students.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
BUS - Lobby

10:00am MDT

Debate: Children with learning disabilities should be mainstreamed
Children with learning disabilities should be mainstreamed. Both sides of this debate will be presented, including scholarly research supporting each side. Based on this collection of research, group conclusions will also be discussed. This project fulfills requirements for FLHD 1500


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Debate: Cohabitation before marriage is an important step for a successful long-term relationship.
Both sides of this debate will be presented, including scholarly research supporting each side. Based on this collection of research, group conclusions will also be discussed. This project fulfills requirements for FLHD 1500.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Debate: Men and women are born into immutable gender roles
We will be presenting a debate on gender roles. We will be presenting both sides of this debate, with scholarly research supporting each side. Based on the research found, we will also discuss group conclusions. This project fulfills requirements for FLHD 1500.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Debate: The increasing medicalization of birth is harmful to both mothers and their babies
Debate: the increasing medicalization of birth is harmful to both mothers and their babies. Both sides of this argument will be presented, backed up by scholarly research supporting both sides. Based on research group conclusions will also be discussed. This project fulfills requirements for FLHD 1500.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Divorce Rates are the Highest They Have Ever Been
We are presenting research pertaining divorce rates.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Educational games on electronic devices can benefit infants in their cognitive development
We will talk about both sides on our controversial topic whether electronic games on devices help infants cognitive development or not. Then give our synthesis on the research we found on our presentation.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Females and Males are socialized to approach moral questions in different ways.
In our presentation we will be presenting both sides of the topic of "Females and Males are socialized to approach moral questions in different ways" and then giving our synthesis on the said research we found.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Fishing For Proteins
The goal of this experiment is to develop a new way to separate copper binding proteins from non-copper binding proteins. We created a supported lipid bilayer inside a microfluidic device by flowing a solution of lipid vesicles into the device. When the vesicles come into contact with an annealed glass slide, they burst and adhere to the surface of the glass. A copper solution is then flushed through the microfluidic device. The copper ions bind strongly to the phosphatidylserine contained in the bilayer. A protein solution was able to flow through the device allowing the proteins that bind copper to stick to the phospholipid bilayer. The proteins that did not bind copper pass freely through the device. When we decrease the pH by passing acid through the device, the serine group on the phosphatidylserine becomes protonated, and detaches from the copper and from the bilayer. If the pH is made acidic at a slow rate, then the proteins will be released from the bilayer at different rates according to their relative binding affinities for copper allowing the copper binding proteins to be separated from each other. The protein solutions are tagged with fluorophores along with the lipids. Used in conjunction with a fluorescence microscope, we can visualize the presence of proteins and lipids in the channel of the device.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Genetic testing for at-risk carriers of abnormal genes
On a poster we will be presenting our research on two opposing sides of a controversial topic and a synthesis on what we have found. We are covering the topic of if parents that are at-risk carriers of abnormal genes should be subject to mandatory genetic testing


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Investigation of a crossed benzoin-like condensation
The Benzoin Condensation is a reaction that couples two aldehydes to form an α-hydroxyketone. Originally this reaction only occurred on aromatic aldehydes but recently there have been many different ways to perform this reaction on molecules that do not contain aromatic groups. In recent years, many methods of synthesizing these hydroxyketones with varying groups attached have been discovered. However, all of them require several steps or expensive materials. We believe that we can optimize a new process that avoids the problems associated with current methods by utilizing umpolung chemistry.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

10:00am MDT

Optimizing Methylene Blue as a Sensitizing Agent
Methylene Blue has the ability to sensitize with oxygen beginning from a singlet spin as well as a triplet state, however the former showing an efficiency of only 50%. Due to this characteristic Methylene Blue is widely used as a phototherapy agent in the fight against cancer. In order to attempt to increase the efficiency of methylene blue to greater than 50% or expand the range in which methylene blue absorbs it will be combined with other dyes or elements, such as rhodamine 6g. A UV-vis. spectrometer and a Fluorometer where used to determine the absorbance and fluorescence of methylene blue as well as for rhodamine 6g. With this information in mind these dyes were combined and excited using excitation spectra to determine if a transfer of energy occurred. More information is needed for more conclusive data and more combinations with other compounds and elements will be further investigated.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

10:00am MDT

Screening for Microbial Dissimilatory Reduction of Metals via a Colorimetric Plate Assay
Microbial dissimilatory reduction of metals is the process by which certain microbes utilize various metallic and metalloid reagents as terminal electron acceptors in cellular respiration. Metal reduction depends on the organism's ability to use a variety of extracellular electron-directing mechanisms potentially including direct electron transfer via outer membrane enzymes, nanowires, or pili, or through the use of soluble electron shuttles. Some bacterial genera, including Geobacter, Aeromonas, Rhodoferax, Desulfobulbus, and Shewanella, each noted for their ability to reduce insoluble extracellular metal ions, have proven useful for electricity production in experimental microbial fuel cells. However, the current range of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) is unknown. Past studies have demonstrated that under the appropriate conditions, electrically conductive nanowires are not limited to DMRB and can develop in cyanobacteria and thermophilic fermentative bacteria. This finding greatly increases the range of potential metal reducing bacterial species. The objective of the current proposal is to develop a colorimetric plate assay capable of large-scale testing of bacterial cultures for dissimilatory metal-reduction activity. Past studies have also demonstrated that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, grown anaerobically on lactate with silica ferrihydrite as the sole terminal electron acceptor, yielded a color change of red to black, which was indicative of the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II). Other metals, including vanadium, copper, chromium and cobalt exhibit color-changing properties based on oxidation state and may prove useful in testing for DMRB


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Should we try to protect self esteem or challenge it in children
We are going to argue both sides as to whether or not self esteem in children should be protected or challenged. This presentation will contain research information for you to conclude whether or not it should or shouldn't.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Social Media is to blame for depression increases in teens
Social media is to blame for the increase in teen depression: In this presentation we will expand on the idea that social media is a crucial part in what teenagers think of themselves. We will show results and tests that show how it has increased, and proof that social media is the leading reason.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Social media is to blame for depression increases in teens
We will be talking about the controversy of social media is to blame for depression increases in teens. We will talk about both sides of the argument and give a synthesis of the ending research.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Spanking is permissible in certain situations
We will discuss how spanking is and is not permissible in certain situations. We will discuss how it is positive punishment, and can be considered a tool for parenting. However, there are boundaries to spanking that we will cover. We will also talk about parenting roles and how it affect the developing child.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

The effects of elevated glucose and stress levels on the liver and hippocampus structure in brown rats (Rattus norvegicus)
Stress and excessive sugar consumption are a regular part of many, if not most Americans lifestyles and diets. High levels of stress coupled with large amounts of sugar may have serious health effects on the body. Chronic exposure to stress hormones, whether it occurs during the prenatal period, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood or aging, has an impact on brain structures involved in cognition and mental health. Repeated stress can also cause reversible impairments of spatial memory performance. Our study observes the physical and structural changes this high intake of glucose coupled with extended exposure to stress causes in organisms. The effects of stress during aging are associated with both memory impairments and reduced hippocampal volumes. In order to test this hypothesis, forty rats (Rattus norvegicus) were used as test subjects exposed to stress only, glucose only, stress + glucose, and a control. Following a two-hour fasting period and a blood-glucose test, we administered to rats either a glucose solution or undiluted water via a feeding needle, depending on their designated treatments. Rats receiving the stress treatment were placed inside a rodent restrain bag for 10 minutes to induce stress but without causing harm. We administered to control subjects water, these rats were handled but allowed to freely crawl through the bag. Afterward, we measured blood-glucose levels of all rats using a standard glucometer. This process was repeated every other day for sixty days after rats were humanely euthanized and dissected to determine any structural changes in liver and brain.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

10:00am MDT

The Negative Effect of an Automatic Intensity Step-down Function During NMES Treatments
Effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) treatments is considered to be primarily dependent upon peak torque production during NMES-induced contractions throughout the treatment. A positive relationship exists between stimulus intensity and the subsequent NMES-induced torque production, thus researchers and clinicians often attempt to maximize stimulus intensities during NMES treatments. However, various electrical stimulators have a little known function that automatically reduces the stimulus intensity when a change in impedance is sensed during a treatment; which may result in a greater decline in torque production over the course of a treatment and subsequently reduce its efficacy. We believe a lack of familiarity with this “automatic step-down” function may exist, as there is a dearth of literature addressing its potential consequences; thus a comparison of the decline in NMES-induced torque over the course of NMES treatments with and without the occurrence of the automatic step-down is warranted. Therefore, our objective during this study was to examine the effects of this little known function that may automatically reduce the stimulus intensity when a change in impedance is sensed. This presentation will provide results that demonstrate that the automatic step-down function has the potential to negatively impact the effectiveness of NMES treatments.

Speakers
CB

Cody Bremner

Southern Utah University


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

10:00am MDT

The Pros and Cons of Cohabitation before Marriage
We will be presenting both sides of this controversial topic on whether or not cohabitation before marriage is an important step for long term relationships.
We will be discussing the long term effects and outcome of each side, as well as giving our synthesis on the research we have found.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

There is no difference between children in same sex couples and traditional male/female couples
Through this poster we will be looking at both sides of the argument relating to the differences between children raised by same sex couples. The upbringing of children in a same-sex household is a hotly-debated topic in order to determine if the environment is good for a developing child. We will be looking at studies done on children raised in traditional and same-sex households in order to see if there are any significant differences between each of the environments. Our initial hypothesis is that there is no difference in children raised by a same-sex couple.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Today's Parents Are Too Permissive
We will be presenting about how todays parents are too permissive and allowing to their children in modern society. We will be researching both sides of the argument and finding different points of view to help present our topic.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Today's Parents are too Permissive
We will be presenting a poster board of both sides of an argument that todays parents are too permissive.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Today's Parents are too Permissive
Our presentation will include both sides of an argument that will illustrate whether or not today's parents are too permissive. Children are being exposed to a lot of new things at a very young age and we are going to explore the disciplinary actions of the guardians of these young people.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Vaccination Education
Vaccinations have been a well debated topic for years, especially in the parenting world. Some believe all children should be vaccinated, and some believe that vaccinations only hurt those who receive them. Like in most arguments, both sides contain truths and points of view worth evaluating. Our goal with this project is to present both sides of the vaccination argument to help further educate people on the topic.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Sanitation efficacy of 70% isopropyl alcohol vs blue light treatment on reusable electrodes
Context: Reusable self-adhesive electrodes are frequently used in Athletic Training facilities during the application of electrical stimulation treatments, but infection control is a concern with their use. Traditionally, 70% isopropyl alcohol wipes are used as a sanitation method for these electrodes, but blue light treatment may be another option. The efficacy of these treatments may not hold true with respect to reusable self-adhesive electrodes due to the adherent properties of the surface. Our objective was to examine the efficacy of 70% isopropyl alcohol and blue light therapy for sanitizing staphylococcus aureus bacteria on electrodes previously used in an Athletic Training facility. We hypothesized that both methods would effectively reduce staphylococcus aureus bacteria on previously used electrodes. Methods: This study was completed on 30 used self-adhesive electrodes collected from a local Athletic Training facility. Electrodes were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups (alcohol wipe, blue light or control), with 10 electrodes in each group. The alcohol wipe group was treated with one single wipe of 70% isopropyl alcohol using a systematic approach to ensure complete coverage of the electrode. The blue light treatment group was treated with a light probe at a dosage of 3 J/cm² per point using a systematic approach to ensure complete coverage. The control group received no intervention. Electrodes were incubated at room temperature for 24 hours. The number of staphylococcus aureus colony forming units (CFU) on each electrode was counted. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to analyze the data for between group differences with respect to the number of CFU. Results: There were no significant between group differences (H2=3.431, P=0.180; Alcohol=123.1±83.2CFU, Blue Light=285.3±394.5CFU, Control=342.0±339.6CFU). Conclusions: Sanitation treatments included in this study were no more effective than a control condition. This suggests that these treatments may not be clinically appropriate for sanitizing reusable self-adhesive electrodes.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

A Needs Assessment of Child and Family Mental Health Needs in a Rural Community
Many benefits are reflected by past literature of child and family therapy, especially in rural communities. Local community agencies, such as the Family Support Center (FSC) in Cedar City, have recognized considerable difficulties in finding adequate referrals for mental health treatment for children in the county. Families accessing the Family Support Center have indicated formally that they often travel (sometimes over 50 miles) to access specialized services. The present community needs assessment research exists to gather data in support of an application for funding from the Victims of Crime Assistance grant, established by the Victims of Crime Act (VOCA). Funding from the grant will be used to improve services by hiring child and family therapists in the Cedar City and Iron County areas.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Alcoholism and the abuse of drugs is hereditary
Our group is going to make a poster for our human development class then we are going to present this at the festival of excellence for our final project. Our poster is going to focus on Alcoholism and drug abuse and how it is hereditary. We are going to show both sides of the argument, while staying objective. This topic will show information to the public that will hopefully be useful in all of their own lives. This poster will be a display item.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Alcoholism and the abuse of other drugs is hereditary
We will be doing a presentation about how alcoholism and the abuse of other drugs is hereditary. Both sides of this debate will be presented, including scholarly research supporting each side. Based on this collection of research, group conclusions will also be discussed. This project fulfills requirements for FLHD 1500.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

An Analysis of Two Suicide Hypotheses
Suicide is a tragedy. The search to learn more about the motivations and behaviors that lead to suicide in order to prevent it is growing. The present research will focus on two theories of suicide developed by evolutionary psychologists. One is the Altruistic Suicide Hypothesis (ALH), which states that suicidal ideation and completion results from a perceived feeling of burdensomeness to kin, and a perception of low reproduction value (ability to have children). The present research will also look at Life History Theory (LHT), which is an evolutionary theory that states those with poor environments adapt a faster life strategy marked by early onset of puberty and higher number of births, and at religious strain. We expect correlations between LHT and ALH such that fast life strategists at a greater risk for suicide, as will those with greater stress in their relationship with their religion. We will use several published measures, including for suicidality, LHT, religious strain, burdensomeness, and reproductive value. Also, we will investigate another theory of suicide, the Parasite Manipulation Hypothesis, which suggests that the parasite toxoplasmosa gondii may affect the human brain in ways that alter behavior and increase the risk for suicide. Studies have shown a higher infection of T. gondii in those with schizophrenia and other mental disorders. Currently there are no measures that calculate risk of T. gondii contraction, so we have made one for this research. Once all data is collected, multiple regression will beused to find the best predictors of suicide.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Basic Principles of Prenatal Health
Research has shown that the health and nutrition of a mother significantly impacts the growth and development of a fetus and the health of the mother during pregnancy. For our study, we looked at potential harms of a malnourished mother and the effects it can have on mom and baby. After researching this information, we taught a group of college women of childbearing age about our findings. These findings specifically identified the importance of nutrition and what vitamins and foods can be increased or decreased in their diets. At the end of our presentation, we had the group of females tell us five changes they could make to promote their current or future maternal and neonatal health. This presentation will help provide women with information on how to properly care for their body's and their future children


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Benefits of Physical Activity on Academics
This research examines the impact of physical activity on academic performance and achievement. With the primary focus of the American education system being on subjects such as math, science, and reading, physical education and extracurricular athletics have taken a lesser role in the education system. The portion of obese children in the United States has grown immensely in recent years; at the same time, people wonder why test scores are low and why students are not performing as well. This research aims to describe the benefits of physical activity on overall academic performance for students.
Along with the benefits of physical activity on academics as a whole, this research delves deeper into the benefits of physical activity on brain structure and cognitive development. Information from several research studies that support my theory on the benefits of physical activity for greater academic performance among students has also been included. Multiple studies have shown that when students are physically active, they outperform their peers in the classroom and on standardized testing. This research briefly examines the impact that physical activity during childhood and adolescence has on future educational level and socio-economic position into adulthood.
Due to time restraints, research for this paper was done solely from other researchers collected data, and I unfortunately was not able to conduct my own research in the field. In addition, because of the nature of this assignment, I could only include a limited number of resources in my research for this paper.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Breast feeding vs. Bottle feeding
We are looking to argue both sides of the topic Breast feeding vs. Bottle feeding to allow the public to understand the pros and cons of both sides so they can make their own educated decisions of what they feel is best.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Dance Training and its Effects on Balance in Healthy Young Adults
While maintaining balance during upright standing is a complex task, dancers are challenged beyond the normal confines of average postural stability. The purpose of this study is to determine if ballet training has an impact on overall balance compared to the average healthy young adult. Drawing correlations between these two populations could lead to further research between different dance styles, the impact of several years of training, and how balance training can impact dance performance and overall health.

Speakers
avatar for Ashlee Humphries

Ashlee Humphries

Ashlee Humphries is a senior at SUU and is majoring in athletic training with a minor in dance performance. She will graduate with honors in May and LOVES southern Utah. Ashlee recently accepted a job as the athletic trainer for cheer and dance at Virginia Tech, where she will also... Read More →


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Eating Healthy on a Budget
Many students at Southern Utah University struggle to get enough to eat without breaking the bank. Because fast food and junk food is so cheap, many students choose to eat out thinking that healthy foods cost more. However, according to our research, students can make a variety of different healthy meals for a comparable cost to that of unhealthy foods. Overall, our research shows that it is possible for students to eat healthy on a limited budget.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Educational games on electronic devices can benefit infants in their cognitive development.
Our presentation will discuss the benefits of educational games on electronics for infants. We will address the research, experiences, and results of different experiments. We will discuss how these games influence infants in their everyday life.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Evaluation of desert plant extracts inhibition of biofilm formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Bacteria in close proximity to each other are able to send out signals called autoinducers. These small molecules change the gene expression within the bacteria allowing them to coordinate cellular activities. This cell-to-cell communication can lead to the formation of biofilms. While biofilms provide many advantages to the microbial community, biofilms have unfortunately been found to cause health problems, contaminate water, and becoming resistant to antimicrobial agents. Some components of plants such as ginger extracts and green tea leaves have been found to naturally inhibit the growth of biofilms through compounds found naturally within the plants. However, little is known about desert plants and their ability to naturally inhibit biofilm formation. In this study, a biofilm formation assay will be used to promote growth of biofilms from the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus mutans with and without desert plant extracts. Extracts taken from desert plants surrounding Southern Utah will then be tested for their biofilm inhibition activity.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

FCHD 1500
Children enrolled in high-quality preschools experience advanced social and cognitive development beyond that of preschoolers who remain at home, with research on both sides.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Helping College Students Create Exercise Habits
Helping College Students Create Exercise Habits

It is common knowledge that exercise is good for your health. However, it is not common for college students to have a steady exercise plan. Busy schedules, lack of knowledge of resources, lack of motivation, and many other factors can contribute to why many college students don’t exercise regularly despite knowing it is good for them. As a group of nursing students we prepared a presentation helping students to understand the body’s exercise needs, benefits of exercise, and resources available. We also helped them learn how to make specific and individualized goals, and identify ways to overcome exercise barriers . We then invited the students to make a specific and attainable exercise goal. We were able to evaluate the success of our education by reviewing the student’s goals with them post education. We found that once educated on ways to exercise and resources available, students became motivated to start on goals specialized for them.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Increasing Medicalization of Birth; Harmful to Mothers and Babies?
Our poster explores increasing the medicalization of birth and whether this will negatively or positively effect mothers and babies.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Is teen suicide the highest it has ever been?
Our group will be presenting both sides of the question "Is teen suicide the highest it has ever been?"


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Non-biological parenthood is much riskier than biological parenthood
We will be discussing the risks of Non-biological parenthood along with the pros of a biological parenthood and the affects they have on the developing child.We will be presenting the results that were found explaining the findings of our research.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Perception of Body Fat among Female College Students
Many individuals are dissatisfied with their body fat percentage. This study explored the knowledge of body fat, body fat percentage, and BMI in female college students. Participants’ estimated weight and body fat percentage was compared to actual measurements. Seventy participants, mean age 18.6 years old (±0.9), were surveyed. When shown seven silhouette images of females with different BMIs ranging from


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Should we try to protect self esteem or challenge it in children
Class presentation. Human development. A study of whether we Should we try to protect self esteem or challenge it in children.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Smile for Success: Effect of Facial Expressions and Hemispheric Dominance on Cognitive-motor Performance
The Facial Feedback Hypothesis theorizes that moving facial muscles to mimic an emotion (e.g. smiling or frowning) is sufficient in and of itself to elicit the corresponding emotion. We hypothesized that because facial expressions have an effect on a person’s emotions, this could influence performance on a cognitive-motor task. Previous research suggests that cognitive tasks and emotional experiences are hemispheric-dependent. As such, we also looked for a possible relationship between facial expression, hemispheric dominance (HD) and cognitive-motor performance. To test this, we recruited SUU students enrolled in Psychology 1010 courses. We had students take surveys to determine their dominant hemisphere and their present mood state. They then completed a cognitive-motor task (the Reverse Mirror Tracing task) while smiling or frowning. Skin conductance (SC- a physiological correlate of frustration) was measured throughout. After completing the task, we asked participants to rate their perceived frustration levels. We ran multiple 2-way ANOVAs to see what effect HD and facial expression had on performance and frustration scores. The results showed that neither smiling nor frowning had an effect on performance or self-reported frustration scores. A linear multiple regression was also used to determine which variables might predict performance scores, and again, nothing significant was found. However, after controlling for initial mood and pre-expression SC in a 2-way ANCOVA, self-reported frustration levels were higher for the frown condition compared to the smile condition (p=.042). Even though the main hypotheses of the study were not supported, SC levels showed that there may be a trend that the design of the study was not able to capture entirely. Different ways to measure cognitive-motor performance and selecting from a more diverse participation pool are suggested for future studies.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Blood Glucose Responses to the Sight and Smell of High and Low Glycemic Food in Mice
Cephalic phase responses (CPRs) are digestion-related physiological changes that occur prior to nutrient absorption. These changes prepare the animal (both human and non-human) for nutrient absorption and the disruption of homeostasis that results when the body is challenged by the intake of food (see Powley, 1977 for a review). CPRs are triggered by food cues such as the sight and smell of food, thoughts of food, and stimuli that have been conditioned to signal the presentation of food (Feldman & Richardson, 1986). Understanding CPR’s are important because they are thought to influence later phases of digestion (Powley, 1977). Numerous CPRs have been identified, most notably insulin (e.g. Sjöström, Garellick, Krotkiewski, & Luyckx, 1980). Blood glucose (BG) has received comparatively less attention. There is convincing evidence that CPRs are both innate and acquired through experience. Several studies have demonstrated that CPRs can be classically conditioned (Brunstrom, & Mitchell, 2007; Powley & Berthoud, 1985). To test the hypothesis that a cephalic phase BG response is dependent on the food’s glycemic index, we allowed 19 male mice to consume a high GI food (Froot Loops) and a low GI food (cheese) on alternate days over a 4-week period. We predicted they would come to learn the physiological consequence of each (an increase in BG to the former and little to no increase in the latter). Subsequently, when exposed to the sight and smell alone of each food, the mice would respond with similar, albeit weaker, BG responses. To control for the possibility that the mice are responding to the palatability of the food rather than its glycemic index, we will record the time each mouse spends touching/orienting toward the container in which the food is presented. Data collection is on-going but the results will be presented at the conference.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

10:00am MDT

Drawing Skills in Anatomy and Physiology Students
“Fake it ‘til you make it”; every college student has heard this phrase, and many live by it. Projected confidence seems to benefit students in many ways, even if there is no skill behind it. We applied this concept to anatomy and physiology students by assessing their confidence levels pertaining to their drawing abilities. Research tells us drawing and actively recording information aids in retention and memory (OCR, 2015; Fernandes et al., 2018), and, courses that require analysis of complex or abstract concepts call on students to use visual orientations and model-based reasoning skills often found in drawing (Quillin and Thomas, 2015). Two such courses of interest to the researchers at SUU are Anatomy and Physiology. Anatomy and physiology are both visually-oriented disciplines, and drawing diagrams is a significant and required step toward understanding material. With this in mind, many students often reported they were not confident in their drawing skills. This lead us to wonder if that affected their understanding of the material, and its ability to predict student performance? To answer this, we constructed a survey consisting of 15 questions that had students report their feelings about drawing skills, drawing in general, and the use of drawing as a study method. Our poster will detail our progress in researching these questions and our analysis of student exam drawings to determine if their exam scores and level of effort relate to their reported drawing abilities. This research is still in the preliminary stages, so we will report on pre-survey data along with analysis of the first 2 exams from anatomy and physiology courses. At the end of the semester, we will collect a post survey to identify if any changes have occurred in student’s views toward drawing as a study tool as well as any predictors of success.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

10:00am MDT

Textbooks: Obsolete or Eternal?
Students in American high schools and universities have used textbooks for decades, but with the rise of technology, online resources, and cost of education, students and teachers alike are turning to modern, innovative, and low cost methods for learning. Although textbooks ensure that curriculum is consistent across schools, districts, and even statewide, they still provide a limited set of information and one style of learning that may benefit all students. As technology grows and changes, the way teachers help their students learn should evolve as well. Many students find themselves spending copious amounts of money on textbooks that do not ultimately fulfill their personal studying needs or promote effective learning. Effective learning environments promote student questions, various divergent learning methods, and opportunities for creativity while also making connections from classroom learning to real world situations. Many times students purchase textbooks to appease teachers and professors, but make use of free online resources that better fit their personal studying style. We are conducting this survey to gather information on the study tools and methods students feel help them in the most significant way to truly learn and succeed in the classroom setting. We will be presenting data on study methods and various tools that students find the most effective. We hypothesize that digital textbooks and a combination of online resources may prove to be more effective than physical textbooks for optimal learning.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

10:00am MDT

Painting in Egg Tempera
Egg tempera is a unique painting medium that has been used throughout the centuries. Egg tempera paintings have a luminosity and archival quality that is appealing to artists and art buyers alike. In April of 2018, I participated in a workshop entitled “The Portrait in Egg Tempera” taught by master egg tempera artist Koo Schadler. I learned the basics of the medium and am including it this year in my Art 4500 Materials and Techniques class. Egg tempera paints are made with pigment and pure egg yolk. Egg tempera artists work with pure powdered pigments instead of squeezing pre-mixed paint from a tube. This display shows the step by step process of an egg tempera painting from start to finish.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:00am - 12:00pm MDT
MA - SUMA
  Creative Expression & Analysis

10:10am MDT

Have you met TED...x?
TEDx is educational, innovative, promotes creativity, is fun and should be an annual event at SUU. This presentation will give background of TEDx events along with how it can be of benefit to Southern Utah University and its community.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:10am - 10:17am MDT
ST - Kolob Canyon Living Room
  Creative Expression & Analysis

10:15am MDT

"Lords and Ladies", Kaylee Prunty (BFA Exhibition, Graphic Design)
“Lords and Ladies” is a set of elegant, designer playing cards, complete with 54 custom illustrations and accompanying package design.
This project was an exploration of how themes of complexity and minimalism can coexist in a single design piece. My fascination with the extravagant style of baroque era art strongly influenced the concept and illustrations of the face cards, with each suit representing a different pedigree of famous rulers. These cards not only show skillful craftsmanship but also the idea that stunning art can exist in a portable, consumable medium.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:15am - 10:30am MDT
MA - SUMA

10:20am MDT

Community Engaged Conservation Genetics
To learn deeply and become invested in science course content, students need to be engaged in course material beyond memorization of facts. High impact practices can build a sense of ownership and interest in students. In 2018, the genetics faculty at SUU implemented a new set of laboratories focused on the high impact practices of undergraduate research and community engaged learning. The combined practice of research and community engagement was powerful enough that it warranted expansion to other courses, and communication to other practitioners. In this presentation I will our approach to building and assessing community engaged courses in the sciences.

Speakers
avatar for Jacqualine Grant

Jacqualine Grant

Associate Professor, Southern Utah University
People should talk to me about biocultural diversity, distributed food networks, and how to use next generation sequencing to engage STEM students with the community.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:35am MDT
ED 215
  Community Engagement

10:20am MDT

The SUU Tanner Center's New Student Story Project
Each of us have a story, firmly planted in the ground of our personal values, which makes us who we are. When we are brave enough to share these experiences, something spectacular happens.

As we come together as students and openly express our beliefs and background, prejudice, bigotry and ignorance dissipate. We begin to see each other and our world in a different light; our stories, together, make a clearer picture of ourselves and our university.

The purpose of The Grace A. Tanner Center’s new student story project is to paint the picture and showcase the values and individuals that make SUU what it is today. The website will contain experiences from all over campus shared through art, photography and the written word.

Over the last year, the creation of the center’s website, marketing and social media, alongside the gathering of student stories, has been underway in preparation for the official project launch event on April 3rd.

Speakers
avatar for Ansleigh Mikesell

Ansleigh Mikesell

Tanner Center Creative Director Intern and University Journal Editor, SUU
I am a storyteller.When people ask what my specialty is, or what my passions are, I find myself puzzled. Sometimes I say, "film". Sometimes I say, "design". Sometimes I say, "writing". But the truth is I am a Jack of all trades.As a current student at Southern Utah University studying... Read More →


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:35am MDT
BUS 242
  Community Engagement

10:20am MDT

Days and Days - Fun Home
A singing performance by Sara Funk. Sara performed this song last semester (Fall 2018) in SUU's Theatre Arts and Dance production of Fun Home. This production was a turning point in Sara's career as an actor and made headlines throughout the department.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:35am MDT
MU - Thorley Recital Hall

10:20am MDT

The SUU Wind Symphony: This is Not Your Grandma's Concert Band
The concert band has come along way since the early music of John Philip Sousa of the early twentieth century. And as directors of bands, we certainly continue to recognize and perform this great music of our past. But new and exciting things are happening in the world of concert bands! With the use of live recordings of the SUU Wind Symphony, I will introduce this exciting new music being written and performed by college and professional concert bands to an audience that may be unaware of these fresh, new sounds.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:35am MDT
BUS 244
  Creative Expression & Analysis

10:20am MDT

U.S. hegemony in the Asia-Pacific: Is it still the case?
Since the beginning of time individuals, societies, states, and sovereign nations have attempted to spread their ideology and gain power--the 21st century has shown to be no exception. The crusades, colonialism, and relatively all wars the world has experienced have been attempts to influence others for personal gain. Both have been debatably unsuccessful in one way or another. However, there is a much more effective way to exert power to pressure others to be in agreeance with your policies--becoming the world’s hegemon. Becoming a modern superpower is no easy task, however, it allows one to gain hegemonic power which in turn influences those who have less resources or protection. The United States has had a non-faded hegemony in the Asia-Pacific region for quite some time. There is no question that the United States still remains a relevant power to take into consideration when discussing international order and international politics. Although, it seems as if there is a changing tide in the Asia-Pacific region with the balance of powers. With the rise of Eastern Asia economically, politically, and militarily, there is a new gain of influence and competition. Although the United States still holds the title of ‘superpower’, there is reason to believe that China’s rise will bring about a new hegemon--or at the very least compete for that title--in the Asia-Pacific. East Asia’s rise will likely be at the expense of the United States, which will in turn bring a new set of challenges and instability to the region. Although an entire exchange of influence has not taken place, there are reasons to believe that the time is coming that the United States will lose their advantage. This paper will examine the United States hegemonic power in the Asia-Pacific region and China’s rise in its relation.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:35am MDT
ED 204

10:20am MDT

Bread, Roses, Poetry: The Rhetorical Verse of Arturo Giovannitti
In January of 1912, a twenty-nine year old orator named Arturo Giovannitti arrived in Lawrence, Massachusetts and delivered a rousing speech to striking textile workers in the city's common square. Within ten days, a sixteen year old striker had been shot and killed during a labor demonstration while Giovannitti—arrested and charged with inciting her murder—turned to poetry as a means of spurring rhetorical action from a Massachusetts prison cell.



In this presentation, I show that Giovannitti, though by all accounts an excellent public speaker, is perhaps most instructive to the field of rhetoric as an exemplar of poetry's rhetorical potential for inspiring political and social action. His poems, responding to the specific political exigencies of his labor-organizing efforts and subsequent arrest, display explicit hortatory goals and persuasive ends and enjoyed wide circulation, especially among progressives, labor organizers, and laborers themselves during the early twentieth century. Furthermore, Giovannitti's poems, with their frequent critiques of the author's incarceration, offered an alternative to—and augmentation of—traditional judicial rhetoric, appealing to audiences who, due to confluences of economic, racial, political, and linguistic issues, were disadvantaged by the early twentieth-century American court system.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:35am MDT
BUS 246
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

10:20am MDT

Crossing the Beams: Building a Particle Sizer
Lipids are an important part of cell membranes. When in water, these lipids form a model cell shape called a vesicle. When lipid vesicles come in contact with smooth glass they form Supported Lipid Bilayers (SLB) which are unrolled, flattened, lipid vesicles on glass. These bilayers are important for the purification, separation, and study of cell membrane substituents. We form an SLB in a microfluidic device to study the conversion of bilayers into vesicles. As a fast-moving buffer flows over these bilayers, it disrupts the bilayer and strips portions of it from the glass. We hypothesize that these stripped lipids are then reformed into vesicles. However, we can only observe their stripping. We are building a particle analyzer to determine the number and size of the particles that are produced from stripping the bilayer. In our device, a laser shines on the solution from the stripping experiment and the scattered light is analyzed thus making a light scattering particle sizer.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:35am MDT
BUS 120
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

10:20am MDT

The Making of a Couture Dress
This presentation walks through some of the steps and techniques and planning that goes into the creation of a couture level garment. Between the design, patterning, mock-up, alterations, and multiple fittings this is the process that high-end couture ateliers go through to make a dress for their client to give them a custom made a garment tailored to fit their body perfectly. High-end sewing also includes various techniques to finish fabrics and provide structure to ensure the strength and longevity of the garment while still ensuring a beautifully sewn piece.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:35am MDT
LIB 201A

10:20am MDT

Is your water anoxic?
Understanding anoxic environments is a relatively unexplored field of study that could have an impact on several aspects of life. For this reason, we seek to learn how oxygen levels affect a wide array of reactions by manufacturing a device that is sensitive enough to quantify low levels of oxygen and durable enough to withstand harsh environments. Recently, we have optimized designs to make a microfluidic device that is small enough to decrease reaction time, without sacrificing the durability of the device. Our designs are modeled after the STOX electrode, but we have chosen to use a PDMS microfluidic rather than glass to increase sturdiness. We also use a unique fabrication technique that allows us to create three dimensional channels rather than being constricted to two dimensions, as are most microfluidic devices. We are currently calibrating our device and preparing it for further field testing.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:35am MDT
ED 202

10:20am MDT

Chemical and Sedimentation Changes from Crow's Creek to Coal Creek
Coal Creek, the primary water source for much of Iron County, is markedly different from other water sources originating from Cedar Mountain due to its significant lack of biodiversity. One of the suspected contributing factors to this is the sedimentation due to runoff from snowmelt during the late winter and early spring months. This research characterizes these sedimentation changes.

Crows Creek is a tributary to Coal Creek and, unlike Coal Creek, has normal biodiversity. It does, however, have a significantly higher chloride concentration than other tributaries to Coal Creek. The creek runs adjacent to Highway 14 for a number of miles, and it is suspected that the chloride concentration might be influenced by road salt or other anthropogenic sources. Sedimentation, chloride, and sulfate concentrations along Crows Creek and near some its tributaries will be tested to determine if these are being influenced by the construction and maintenance of Highway 14.

The data from this research will add further information to understanding the limited biodiversity of Coal Creek.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:35am MDT
ED 102

10:20am MDT

Religiosity, Drugs and Suicide Rates: An Inspetion at the County Level
Examining the causality of variation in suicide rates on a national and state level has been of interest to numerous parties for the better part of the last half-century. Suicide is the 14th leading cause of death in the world (CDC, 2015), and will claim more than 2 million lives this year alone. This paper examines the correlation regarding the religiosity of a given county and the drug abuse. The accessibility to drugs and the varying level of acceptance for suicide based on religious tendencies was hypothesized to be a causal factor in the variation of suicide rates at the county level. The findings of this study prove that areas which contain a low religious presence, high drug overdose deaths, and high rural and male resident populations are most at risk for suicides based on the factors provided in the study.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:35am MDT
BUS 126
  Research to Increase our Physical and/or Mental Well­-being

10:20am MDT

Getting Off Track: A Broader Vision for Art Education
Last year, I received an FDSF grant to attend the National Art Education Association's national convention. I attended sessions to explore curriculum models in an effort to rethink and revamp the BFA degree in Secondary Art Education at SUU. The endeavor was fruitful. I came away with innovative ideas, and, in the fall of 2018, I submitted a curriculum proposal to reduce credit hours, provide a better sequence of courses, increase experiential learning opportunities, and engender better career readiness for majors. My presentation will address the latter by examining the changing market for degree holders in art education, namely increasing opportunities in museum education and art therapy. My presentation will highlight economic, professional, and higher education trends and explain how they factored in to a new vision for art education and teacher training at SUU.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:35am MDT
ED 111
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

10:20am MDT

How Much is That Second Major Worth?
Should you double major in college? Research presented in this presentation examines the difference in dollar earnings between college graduates who select to double major for their bachelor’s degree versus those who select to only single major. In an attempt to make themselves more sought after candidates for employment, and to collect a greater return on their education, students are often compelled to double major as they pursue their bachelor’s degree. Does this decision effectively increase student outcomes? Come and find out!

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:35am MDT
ED 104
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

10:20am MDT

Crafting Brand Stories Worth Sharing
Understanding the structure that all good stories must have to resonate with an
audience and applying that structure to brand development and marketing.
Take away tips on how to build stronger, human-centric stories worth sharing.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:55am MDT
BUS 243
  Digital & Information Literacy

10:20am MDT

Moving the Needle: A SUUWN Roundtable
Members of the SUU Women's Network and other Campus Leaders will discuss SUU's Moving the Needle Campaign, which promotes gender equity, women in leadership, and professional development. Topics of discussion will include an overview of the Moving the Needleinitiative, an assessment of accomplishments achieved so far, a review of where we still need to go, and suggestions for the future. All are welcome

Speakers
avatar for Shalini Kesar

Shalini Kesar

Associate Professor of Information Systems, Southern Utah University
Associate Professor of information systems at Dept. of CSIS, Southern Utah University. Teaching and research in information systems related topics including information security. Also Program Leader for Southern Utah Aspirations NCWIT for high school girls and Southern Utah Girls... Read More →
JH

Jennifer Hunter

Director of Innovative Learning and Partnerships, Southern Utah University


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:55am MDT
BUS 238
  Leadership & Entrepreneurship

10:20am MDT

How Biology Department Faculty Utilized Campus Funding Opportunities to Promote Personal and Professional Growth
This round table discussion features Biology Department faculty who attended the 2019 National Association of Biology Teachers Annual Conference. The round table will begin by giving a brief overview of the on-campus funding opportunities available to faculty. Discussants will then share their experiences attending this conference and how the conference has influenced their role as a faculty member. Topics may include tips and tools for increasing student engagement, finding ideas to incorporate experiential learning activities, or how to engage students in undergraduate research. Questions are encouraged!

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:20am - 10:55am MDT
ED 103

10:30am MDT

"Up A Tree", H. Ainsley Steed (BFA Exhibition, Illustration)
Up A Tree is a project I’ve wanted to work on for a while now. I wanted to combine everything I loved as a kid about cartoons into one show, where Mae represents the classic cartoon vibe with her anatomy, movements and expressions being far more loose and elastic whereas Chester represents more grounded cartoons where characters move and feel more like real people. I like to play with proportion and anatomy in my work and I strive to make the most out of every aspect of a character. Exaggeration is a big part of what I love about art and I want to use it to make the world not only more fun, but keep it distinctly relatable.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:30am - 10:45am MDT
MA - SUMA

10:40am MDT

Venezuela Discovers Socialism
A recent Gallup Poll shows that since 2016, those feeling positive about capitalism has dropped from 60% to 56% while those feeling positive about socialism has increased from 35% to 37%. But for people between the ages of 18 and 29, those feeling positive about capitalism has dropped a whopping 23% from 68% to 45%.

This is surprising because "collectivism" has not had a good track record. The GDP of the USA was 4 1/2 times greater than Russia under communism; West Germany produced 2 1/2 times more than East Germany; the island nation of Taiwan out-produces the island nation of Cuba by 3 times, and South Korea produces 23 times more per capita than North Korea.

The recent example of Venezuela's shift to socialism further underscores the futility of such an economic approach. Its GDP went from $529.6 billion in 2015 to $389.4 billion in 2017 (a drop of 26.5%). The unemployment rate went from 6.8% in 2015 to 26.4% in 2017, and the inflation rate went from 181% in 2015 to a staggering 27,364% in May of last year.

If the Venezuela numbers were applied to the United States, there would be $5.4 trillion less in annual GDP and about 35 million more workers would lose their jobs. Demographically, 340,000 doctors and 3.3 million USA citizens would already have left the country.

Giving more benefits to citizens than is sustainable always leads to long-term disaster, and creeping socialism in the United States and its $114.4 trillion in unfunded liabilities has already put the country on that path.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:40am - 10:55am MDT
BUS 242
  Community Engagement

10:40am MDT

Youth Learning CPR
Abstract-

We have learned that people are more likely to initiate CPR if it is hands-only CPR. It is more intimidating to initiate CPR when you have to breathe for people. We specifically sought out youth aged children (12-18 years) because research shows there is an increased risk of accidents among this age group. We gathered supplies to practice chest compressions and provided updated information about CPR and taught hands-only CPR to youth. The results were that the youth were able to demonstrate their new knowledge and practice CPR for emergency situations.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:40am - 10:55am MDT
ED 215
  Community Engagement

10:40am MDT

Piano Sonata No. 1: Beginnings
This will be a performance of my Piano Sonata No. 1: Beginnings, presented in three movements which totals to an approximate run of time of 15 minutes. This would be the first public performance of this sonata, and I would love to share this piece at the Festival.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:40am - 10:55am MDT
MU - Thorley Recital Hall
  Creative Expression & Analysis

10:40am MDT

The Fall of Jerusalem/Al Quds, 1917
On a chill morning, December 11, 1917, an allied force led by British

Troops under the command of General Edmund Allenby entered the

city of Jerusalem. It was a moment that countless past crusaders could

only have dreamt of. It was a moment that should have been, in the

opinion of some, the historic event of the century. Indeed, for T.E.

Lawrence it was “…the supreme moment of the war.” But the city

that had rested in Muslim hands since the Middle Ages fell with

barely a whimper; oddly, for better part of the morning of the city’s

“fall” on December 9 no one could be found to accept its surrender.

And in days to come the shining moment would fade in light of the

fall of Damascus which heralded the defeat and the pending fall of the

Ottoman Empire and the beginning of the very troubled, modern

history of the Middle East.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:40am - 10:55am MDT
ED 204
  Global Engagement

10:40am MDT

Caenorhabditis elegans and Ocean Acidification
The purpose of this study is to determine the role that epigenetics play in gene expression due to altered environments on organisms. Specifically, those that contribute to a change in body construction in response to pH level differences in their environment. This study will be done using Caenorhabditis elegans, a species of thread worms, which will be grown and then placed in varying pH level environments. We will assess the capacity of C. elegans to survive in altered ph level environments. Additionally, we will investigate methylation changes to determine if altered pH conditions effect the epigenetics of C. elegans. This will reveal which/ if any proteins are produced differently in gene expression of C. elegans. This study will provide important preliminary data for studying the epigenetics of organisms in changing environments due to climate change.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:40am - 10:55am MDT
BUS 246
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

10:40am MDT

Classifying Schur Rings Over Infinite Groups
Schur rings are a type of subring of a group ring that is determined by a partition of the group. Schur rings were originally developed by Schur and Wielandt in the first half of the 20th century. They were originally developed to study permutation groups and have since been more widely studied. They were especially studied in the 1980s and 1990s to look at finite cyclic groups, which are finite sets that cycle through their elements equipped with an operation satisfying certain properties. Past research has provided a classification of Schur rings over finite cyclic groups. We as a research team have previously extended the definition of a Schur ring to infinite groups and provided a classification for all torsion-free locally cyclic groups. We have also now have classified Schur rings over the direct product between a torsion free locally cyclic group and a finite cyclic group of prime order. This presentation will explain what a Schur ring is, discuss previous research, and then provide further classification of Schur rings over infinite groups with respect to the direct product between the infinite cyclic group and a finite cyclic group of prime order. This presentation will then conclude with an extension of this previous classification to the direct product between any torsion free locally cyclic group and a finite cyclic group of prime order.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:40am - 10:55am MDT
BUS 244

10:40am MDT

Using chlorophyll concentrations, sessile bacteria concentrations, and chemical composition to identify factors affecting the biodiversity of Coal Creek
Coal Creek, which originates from the Cedar Breaks/Ashdown Gorge Drainage Basin and flows through Cedar City, has very low or no biodiversity and biomass present. Some of the tributaries of Coal Creek have been found to have some living organisms. This raises the question as to why the main creek does not support life. Since the fall of 2012 collection and analysis has been performed on hundreds of samples to determine the concentration of total metals, dissolved metals, anions, chlorophyll and more. We are currently trying to analyze this vast amount of data and collect additional meaningful samples to further identity trends. Furthermore, we are investigating the possibility of variances in sessile bacteria, which allow algae to adhere to rocks, as a factor to explain this lack of biomass. The results of our analysis will be presented to explain the lack of biodiversity and biomass in Coal Creek.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:40am - 10:55am MDT
ED 102

10:40am MDT

External Pressures and its impact on pilots
In this project I will be focusing on the importance of human factors in aviation and the role it plays in plan continuation bias. I will be studying the impact that outside roles or environmental pressures that are placed on pilots by their management or companies in general. This combined with internal pressures such as reputation and pride can produce hazardous flight attitudes that lead to both fatal and nonfatal accidents. I anticipate that on the surface the results will appear inconclusive but upon further examination will provide a link between stressors experienced in the workforce and accident rates across the United States. The issue with assessing this specific topic is that the vast majority of the victims of this pressure and specifically plan continuation bias do not survive the accidents they are in. I hope to be able to draw a more direct link between stressors and the importance of a functional positive feedback or discrepancy reporting programs that have the potential to save pilots lives.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:40am - 10:55am MDT
BUS 120

10:40am MDT

Everything You (N)Ever Wanted To Know About Sex; A Study of Sexual Health Practices within the SUU Community
According to the Center for Disease Control, the average age of sexual activity for individuals in the United States is 17 years old. During their intermediate years of 17 to mid-20s, individuals are at a higher risk for unwanted pregnancies and sexually-transmitted infections. The purpose of this research is to investigate how sexual health indicators within the perceived conservative community of Southern Utah University compares to national statistics. We distributed a sexual and general health survey for the SUU campus that addresses substance use, sexual health practices, health care experience in Cedar City, and other questions that compare to national health surveys. We will present our findings on how at-risk behaviors vs. conservative practices impact sexual and general health within this community. We will also discuss possible ramifications of these results and our recommendations to the university community based on our results.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:40am - 10:55am MDT
BUS 126

10:40am MDT

Building Community, Within a Classroom
Explore the what goes into planning a new undergraduate course focused on developing community. Dr.Schvalla Rivera (Assistant to the President for Diversity and Inclusion) and Amy Thorpe (M.P.A. graduate student) determined to create a course focused on developing community and belonging through the exploration of dialogue. Participation in this session will provide the opportunity to explore to what end the research and planning met when introduced to a group of students during the Spring 2019 semester.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Thorpe

Amy Thorpe

Adjunct Faculty, Graduate Student, Southern Utah University


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:40am - 10:55am MDT
ED 202
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

10:40am MDT

Enhancing Community Connections and Student Learning in the ORPT Curriculum
ORPT 4740/4745 "Organization and Administration for ORPT + Lab" is a senior-level course required for all Outdoor Recreation in Parks and Tourism (ORPT) majors. The course provides an opportunity for students to apply their knowledge and skills related to managing outdoor recreation and leisure programs for participants. Students learn about planning, programming, evaluation, budgeting, human resources management, risk management, policy, and procedures. Students work in small groups with a variety of on- and off-campus organizations to plan and implement their program. With the supervision of a Program Mentor, students are responsible for planning, implementing, and evaluating an outdoor recreation or leisure program. A focus for the 2018/2019 Academic Year is to integrate curricular innovations to improve the level of community engagement among students, improve relationships with our community partners, and enhance student learning outcomes.



This presentation will discuss the motivations for changing the ORPT 4740/4745 curriculum; the specific innovations and changes that were incorporated, why they were chosen, and how they enhance student learning; how the effectiveness of the innovations were assessed; and examples of student programs and how they more effectively fostered community engagement and positive relationships with partner organizations.

Speakers
KG

Kelly Goonan

Southern Utah University


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:40am - 10:55am MDT
ED 104

10:40am MDT

Using HHMI Biointeractive case studies in the classroom
The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has created an educational resources for educators in the biological sciences. This resource can be found at the HHMI bioineractive website. One of the many resources found at this site are professionally produced videos of various case studies. These case studies can be used in the classroom to engage the student in various biological topics. By breaking the case study into specific segments and creating discussion points or questions for each of these segments, an instructor can use a short case study to engage a classroom of students for a full lesson.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:40am - 10:55am MDT
ED 111

10:45am MDT

Emily Mitchell (BFA Exhibition, Illustration)
My BFA work focuses on a personal project that I am currently developing.  I have made four conceptual pieces that capture a major developmental moment or turning point within the narrative.  These pieces were created with the potential of serving as a book cover, spot illustration, promotional art, or title card painting.  All of which are just a few of many real-world applications for illustrative work.
This project takes place in a fantasy world, so for these pieces, I was very visually inspired by medieval imagery, modern character stylization, and decorative arts.  The driving themes of this project include identity, abuse of power, coming of age, the balance of nature, and real versus perceived heroism. I have combined these aspects with the various techniques I’ve had the freedom to explore and develop as an illustration major.  For these four pieces, I used a combination of both traditional and digital techniques.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:45am - 11:00am MDT
MA - SUMA

10:50am MDT

How Will I Know
Orchesis is the dance company at SUU. We are a group of students dedicated to spreading our love of dance around campus and in the community. You can support our company by coming to our concert on April 5 and 6 at 7:30pm in MC116.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 10:50am - 11:05am MDT
MC 116

11:30am MDT

Festival of Excellence Keynote
Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 11:30am - 1:00pm MDT
CC - Gilbert Great Hall
  Keynote

1:00pm MDT

Tanah Hislop's Portfolio
I will be presenting the Design Work and projects I have completed during the school year. I will be bringing in costume pieces and displaying my notes, research, and renderings.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:10pm MDT
JT - Randall Jones Lobby
  Creative Expression & Analysis

1:00pm MDT

Finding Funds for Fun: SUU Honors You
Students from low-income households often do not think they can continue their education after high school because of the cost. SUU Honors You is a program that educates students and excites them about the possibility of going to college and let them know that there are ways to help pay for it. When SUU Honors You was in danger of being discontinued, funding needed to be found for the program to continue. Being able to continue a wonderful experience like SUU Honors You is something that I could not pass up. I set out with a goal of raising a total of $2,000. I thought of different ways that I could raise the amount of money that I had set out to raise. Being able to find enough different ways to raise money in a small, college town and in a short amount of time was one of the challenges that I ran across. SUU Honors You has activities, such as obstacle courses and science demonstrations, that clubs and groups from Southern Utah University plan for the fourth graders to do. From this project, I learned how important it is to work to meet your goals and to push yourself to achieve more than the original plan. This presentation will include the planning, different fundraising methods, and results of fundraising. I will also share what happens at SUU Honors You from when the students arrive to when the students leave.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
BUS 242

1:00pm MDT

Protecting YOUth from STD's
Sex education is very limited to youth, especially in Utah. By the end of the teaching the teenage group, they will be able to give examples of STIs and understand the importance of contraceptives/barriers. Students will properly apply a condom to a banana, as well as demonstrate understanding of content by answering teach back questions. Teenagers were open and attentive to discussing STI's and contraceptives. They were able to answer questions correctly and properly placed condoms on bananas. The teenagers stated that they learned a lot and that it was beneficial to them.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
ED 215
  Community Engagement

1:00pm MDT

Alana Tapaha (BFA Exhibition, Graphic Design)
Yá'át'ééh, shí éí Alana Tapaha yíníshyé’. I get inspired by my culture, especially when it comes with a teaching behind my work. Using my skills as a Graphic Designer to combine the Old Traditions into the contemporary world creating new ways to pass the teachings to the new generations.

A Brief booklet about the Sacred Animals having the Four Sacred Mountains as my cover to distinguish my culture. It is linoleum print with pen drawings describing each characteristic.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
MA - SUMA

1:00pm MDT

Constellations: A Black Box Grant Preview
This semester, I have the opportunity to present one of my favorite plays through the Black Box Grant via SUU TAD. It is a very small cast performed in a small space. The play focuses on the various ways that a relationship between two people can go, a subject that can be very relatable for college students, especially since we go to school in Southern Utah, a place where early marriage is a very prominent thing. A small preview of this piece will be given during this time- about 15 minutes- enough time to introduce the characters without giving too much away about the play. Come and meet Marianne and Roland- a couple that many can relate to. 


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
ST - Kolob Canyon Living Room
  Creative Expression & Analysis

1:00pm MDT

Ending at the Beginning: George Lucas, Peter Jackson, and the Half-Life of Creativity
The magnum opuses of directors George Lucas and Peter Jackson (the original Star Wars trilogy and the Lord of the Rings trilogy, respectively) have helped define generations of movie goers. Their career paths bear a striking resemblance to one another (low-budget indie darlings who went on to create two of the most influential cinematic trilogies of all time), especially when examining each director’s attempts to create prequel trilogies to their original masterworks over a decade later. These follow-ups were critically panned, overproduced, and underwhelming. But why? How did two of the most prolific directors in modern cinema seemingly lose their way when returning to the franchises that made them famous? To answer this question, I will examine both filmmakers and their directing styles through the lense of auteur theory, looking for thematic resonance in their bodies of work. I will cross-examine Lucas and Jackson against the criteria for definition as an auteur as laid out by film writer Andrew Seriss in his essay "Notes on the Auteur Theory" (1962). These criteria, in order of importance, are interior meaning within their work, a distinguishing personality and artistic tone, and technical competence. In addition, I will delve into the production processes behind both sets of trilogies, identifying what practices and examples can be found of either the presence or lack of directing skill. By exploring these topics and more, I will argue that the reason these two monolithic filmmakers tripped at the starting line is because of one, unifying factor: fame.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
BUS 244
  Creative Expression & Analysis

1:00pm MDT

Seven Places You're Not
Seven Places You're Not is a lyric sequence of 12 poems in which the speaker mourns the loss of her father. It explores the concept of grief through poems that are sometimes nostalgic and other times in mourning, but always with the harsh realization of an unchanging loss. The sequence also addresses the effects of the death on other members of the family, expressing the difference of how things were "before" compared to "after." While each poem can stand alone as an individual piece, their arrangement in this series creates an arc through the poetic techniques of powerful imagery, alliteration, subtle echoes of sound, and figurative language.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
BUS 243

1:00pm MDT

International Testing Comparisons
A look at how the United States high school level exams compare with other countries, and also some of the attitudes different countries have towards high school education.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
ED 204
  Global Engagement

1:00pm MDT

Remember, Pudsy! two thousand Pounds!: The Role of Virtue in Eliza Haywood’s A Wife to Be Let
In eighteenth century England, women were trapped in a world of tradition that often left them with little choice. Eliza Haywood, a female writer during the eighteenth century wrote about one of these situations in her often overlooked play A Wife to Be Let (1724). In A Wife to Be Let, Susanna Graspall, simply called “Wife,” is offered to another man by her husband in a more cultured form of prostitution. Though the situation is somewhat exaggerated, it nevertheless is illustrative of the extreme social pressures that women were facing when it came to obedience, virtue, and chastity. The topic of virtue in the eighteenth century was a complicated subject, and in modern perceptions, it may appear to be strictly related to obedience and submissiveness. Historically, however, virtue was actually lauded as something that gave women power and control in a marriage. Haywood, a proponent of this idea, explores this belief through the role of Wife. Through Wife’s desperate attempt to maintain her virtue, the complexity of this issue is explored. What is Wife really facing? Will she be able to save herself through her virtue or will she have to submit to her husband’s desires? This literary analysis focuses on the role of virtue in the eighteenth century in conjunction with the role that women held in society. Due to the differences in the definition of virtue in the twenty-first century and the eighteenth century, recognizing the role of virtue in the eighteenth century can increase understanding of the role of women and the power they supposedly held in comparison to virtue and women’s roles in the twenty-first century.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
BUS 246
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

1:00pm MDT

Game, Set, Match, and Loss Aversion in Tennis
Prospect theory predicts that individuals are more risky when they are losing and more risk averse when they are winning. The predictions of this theory have been tested and proven in experimental settings and real life settings like investment decisions. We use professional tennis as the setting to examine of men and women experience different levels of loss aversion. We find strong evidence that men and women adopt similar strategies in tennis and those strategies are not consistent with loss aversion.

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Price

Joshua Price

Southern Utah University
I am an associate professor in Economics in the Leavitt School of Business at Southern Utah University.I am the Director of the Health Education Action Lab (https://www.heallabs.org/) whose mission is to find data-driven solutions to problems society faces at the intersection of health... Read More →


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
BUS 238
  Leadership & Entrepreneurship

1:00pm MDT

How I “Hike Like a Woman”
Hike Like a Woman. A worldwide organization born out of Laramie, WY that has evolved into a community for women of all backgrounds to share their love for hiking and the outdoors. It offers public retreats, local hiking groups, a podcast, and more. This presentation will focus on the sense of community and belonging that Hike Like a Woman has created, April’s local hiking group, and how she utilizes hiking and the outdoors to stay mindful in everyday life. Free Hike Like a Woman Sticker for each attendee (while they last)!

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
ED 102

1:00pm MDT

Nutritional Analysis of Eggs from Hens with Varied Diets
Backyard chicken flocks have become an increasingly popular choice for many American families. From a few hens housed in a simple coop, a family could have fresh, ethical, sustainable egg production. The benefits of raising your own egg producing hens are many. Firstly, backyard hens are very efficient at consuming food waste as a part of their diet. Rather than throw away leftovers and food prep scraps, hens are happy to turn them into fresh eggs. Also, hens raised in a backyard setting will undoubtedly have a greater quality of life than commercially raised caged hens.

The question we are asking is as follows: How do different housing arrangements and diets change the nutritional content of the eggs produced by hens, if at all? Research has been done in this field, but not extensively in a "backyard flock" type setting. It can be said that backyard flocks are more ethical and efficient than commercially raised eggs, but are they more healthy as well?

We have establish two different flocks. One with a stationary coop, without access to grass, and one with a mobile coop which models a "free range" lifestyle that some people may provide for their backyard flock. Both flocks have equal access to both chicken feed and food scraps. Analysis is being performed on egg white content, egg yolk content, and egg shell thickness in addition to the mass of each egg.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
LIB 201A
  Outdoor Engagement & Environmental Stewardship

1:00pm MDT

Can You Hear Me Now: Promoting Healthy Communication Between Partners
Communication is one of the most frequently focused area in couples therapy. If you do not know how to correctly ask for what you need, you are much less likely to have your needs met. Thankfully it is never too late to increase your communication skills and enhance your chances of being heard and understood.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
BUS 126
  Research to Increase our Physical and/or Mental Well­-being

1:00pm MDT

School Counseling
School Counseling: An Analysis of Suicide Prevention & Intervention in Utah
Mental health has become a topic of much interest and discussion lately. Now more than ever, we need trained, informed, and skilled school counselors and social workers in all levels of school: elementary, middle, and high school. With topics like suicide and self-harm becoming seemingly more prevalent in today's youth, and specifically in Utah, it is crucial that schools are apt and prepared to face these issues and assist students. It is also vital to be able to empower students with skills and mindfulness techniques when difficult times arise in the future. Because I have seen these issues firsthand while participating in an internship at a local middle school, I am invested in the problems and want to research the effectiveness of prevention programs in place at different schools around the state, ways of dealing with trauma, and the possible lack of sufficient help provided.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
BUS 120

1:00pm MDT

Does Anonymity Matter? Examining Quality of Peer Assessment and Students’ Attitudes
The study investigated the effects of anonymity on online peer assessment and compared three different conditions. Fifty-eight preservice teachers engaged in a series of online peer assessments during fall 2017. Peer assessment was embedded in a blended course as a required asynchronous activity using the Canvas learning management system. Students were randomly assigned to three different peer assessment conditions: anonymous, partially anonymous, and identifiable. They were asked to provide feedback comments and rate the quality of peer’s work. The researcher examined to what extent three different conditions had influenced the quality of feedback comments, measured quantitatively through the number of words and negative statements. At the end of the semester, a survey that included a five-point Likert scale and several open-ended questions was also distributed to analyze students’ perceptions about peer assessment and anonymity. The results indicate that although students prefer anonymity, it may not be a necessary condition for increasing student engagement.

Speakers
MK

Michiko Kobayashi

SOUTHERN UTAH UNIVERSITY, USA


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
ED 103
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

1:00pm MDT

Just the tip of the iceberg?: Culture in the Language Classroom
One of the most common goals of many higher education institutions all over the US is to form "world-citizens", but how are we contributing to that noble aspiration in each one of our classes? Specifically: What do we do when we say we are teaching culture in the language classroom setting? Is it efficient? Is it enough? Are students getting anything but the tip of the iceberg of a given culture? In this short talk we will discuss some possible strategies to infuse more life and vibrancy into this crucial but sometimes neglected task.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
ED 111

1:00pm MDT

Kairotic Connections: How Creative Writing and Composition Pedagogies Foster Writer Identity and Connectivity
“Kairotic Connections” is a qualitative pre-pilot study of how creative writing pedagogies foster writer identity and connectivity, how creative writing and rhetoric/composition pedagogies intersect in creative writing and first-year composition courses, and what creative writing as a discipline can bring to rhetoric/composition and vice versa.

Building from a foundation of the rhetorical and creative concept of kairos--the convergence of right time, right place, right audience, right words in the right way to produce the desired effect, the project posits writers' relation to self, to craft, and to the surrounding world as a fundamental, intrinsic condition for them to be or become good writers. The first portion of the study focuses on writer identity and situatedness as university-level creative writing faculty and graduate instructors in interviews and surveys identify the traits and skills of good writers and emphasize the importance of writers' being connected to the places and people around them. The second portion focuses on pedagogical approaches as the faculty and instructors discuss how their assignments and in-class writing exercises help students in creative writing and/or composition courses to achieve or develop the necessary skills and connections. By examining these assignments and writing exercises (especially the ones creative writing instructors use in their academic writing courses), this study notes the intersections between creative writing and composition pedagogies and considers what the two disciplines and, consequently, the students might gain from pedagogical crossovers in writing courses.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
ED 202
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

1:00pm MDT

Pressed Poetry, A Letterpress Poetry Broadside Collaboration
In the fall of 2017, Professor Meri Page from the School of Visual and Performing Arts and Professor Danielle Dubrasky from the School of Humanities & Social Sciences, met to discuss collaborating on an interdisciplinary project in celebration of National Poetry month (April) in the Spring 2018 semester.



The resulting experiential project combined two classes Typography I, and Advanced Poetry, and consisted of graphic design students collaborating with poetry students to design a letterpress poetry broadside of the poetry students work and culminated in a reception, art exhibition, print exchange, and poetry reading at the end of the semester.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:15pm MDT
ED 104

1:00pm MDT

La francophonie
La francophonie

Why do people all around the world speak French? What led to that development? After hundreds of years of foreign relations and colonization, French has established a presence on nearly every continent in the world. From the "Hexagon" to Phnom Pen, Quebec to Papeete, and Ivory Coast to French Guyana, one can hear the dialects, use, and evolution of the French language. The panel will discuss the French speaking world and the people who make up its cultural landscape.

Contradiction and Hyperbole in Magyd Cherfi's Oeuvre

This paper continues my exploration of Magyd Cherfi’s discussion of his own national identity, and examines his essays, songs and most recent novel, Ma Part de Gaulois. Cherfi is a French writer of Berber origin whose works have gained attention within France’s multi-faceted debates on national identity. Cherfi’s own “identity trouble” or “confusion” manifest themselves formally in his texts, which are rife with contradiction and hyberbole. However, these characteristics, along with dichotomy and juxtaposition, are productive strategies in that they lead to some resolution of the identity crisis explored in his works.

A Jew and an Harki: Two Victims of the French Decolonization

In this paper, I examine the narratives of two victims of the war of independence between France and Algeria, a long conflict that ended in 1962. More than fifty years later, two journalists, each in her own way, wrote their story: Danielle Michel-Chich, a Jew, lost a leg in a bombing in Algiers when she was five, and Dalila Kerchouche, a Muslim and daughter of an harki (a group of Muslim Algerians who fought as auxiliaries in the French army), grew up like thousands of other harki families in internment camps in France long after the war had ended. Both women use the account of their personal tragedy to call on the responsible party (the FLN bomber or the French government) to finally acknowledge their responsibility.

Speakers
RP

Rosa Perez

Associate Professor of French, SUU


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:35pm MDT
ED 203
  Global Engagement

1:00pm MDT

The Road to Recycling
Our research has been conducted on recycling in Cedar City and other urban cluster cities of similar population size. The goal of our research was to identify challenges to Cedar City and find solutions that have worked in other communities. Our poster will cover the current situation of recycling in Cedar City as well as analogs to Cedar City and the solutions that have been implemented by both groups. With this poster we hope to educate Cedar City citizens about the obstacles to recycling in our community and what we can do to overcome them.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Community Engagement

1:00pm MDT

Bach's Christ lag in Todes Banden: A Performance-Lecture
Although intended for public worship, the church cantatas of Johann Sebastian Bach constitute one of the greatest artistic achievements of the Baroque (or any) era. In this performance-recital Dr. Krystal McCoy will direct the Opus Chamber Choir and a group of instrumentalists in a performance of selections from one of Bach’s earliest masterpieces in the genre, Christ lag in Todes Banden, BWV 4. Throughout the performance, Dr. Douglas Ipson will remark on the theological and historical context of the work and highlight its most important musical features.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
MU - Thorley Recital Hall
  Creative Expression & Analysis

1:00pm MDT

Gender Inequality in Modern Day Horror Movies
I am doing my Capstone on a content analysis of gender inequality in modern day horror movies. I have picked the top 10 highest grossing slasher movies made after 2010. I will be coding and writing a 20 page research paper on the results.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Creative Expression & Analysis

1:00pm MDT

Low Cost Photonic Crystal for Biomedical Applications
Photonic crystals are periodically structured dielectric or metallo-dielectric media that can be used for controlling the propagation and emission of light due to a photonic band gap. Such media can be used to enhance the sensitivity and accuracy of biosensors. However, producing such media is expensive, making the search for a low cost solution desirable. Two low cost media with such properties have been identified but need to be characterized before further work can be done. The objective of this research is to determine if these low cost media are suitable for use as disposable photonic crystals in biosensor applications.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Creative Expression & Analysis

1:00pm MDT

The State of the Art
Art is a unique expression of the human condition as told by any given individual through a variety of mediums. As a form of expression, art has been an essential part of communication in every culture ever known. While universal, I believe individual motivations behind artistic creation vary from person to person, especially depending on if the person is a “natural artist” who views art as necessary to their life’s purpose. Being an artist entails much more than simply possessing the technical ability to paint, draw, dance, or take photos. Many people who do not claim the title of “natural artist” enjoy these activities as hobbies, mostly mimicking existing styles to try something new or in an attempt to boost creative thinking. To do those activities with a sense of duty, style, and immense pressure to succeed for one’s own spiritual fulfillment is what makes an artist. I seek to find what benefits (or downsides) can be achieved by artists and non-artists who both participate in creative activities. I ultimately seek to answer the question of why art is so vital to the individual human experience, especially in a world where art is being written off more and more as an unnecessary luxury rather than a key form of communication.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Creative Expression & Analysis

1:00pm MDT

Breast vs Bottle
Breastfeeding vs Bottle Feeding: We will be outlining the pros and cons of both breastfeeding and bottle feeding and presenting our conclusions. Through our research, we will determine which is recommended and during which circumstances each is recommended.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Connection Through Vulnerability, & the Vices of Virtual Validation
Throughout various occasions of personal experience and a great amount of observation, I have witnessed a change in the way society and individuals are choosing to approach new relationships. I have seen a significant decrease in people, including myself, making choices based off of emotions rather than cognitive reasoning. The question arises, are all decisions made through emotion, and rationalization, telling ourselves rational lies to be okay with the choices we make? We so focused on give get models that organic relationships are a dying breed.
We, as humans, struggle to connect, balance and build relationships because of our personal and societal unwillingness to practice vulnerability and confront shame. We are forgetting to feel because we are often “too busy” thinking? Have we, as a generation, evolved into guarded getters rather than selfless givers, because we are so uncomfortable with being uncomfortable. What role has social media played in this disconnection we feel while being so connected to our digital devices? Are we living our present and aware truth online or are we faking it, ultimately in fear of shame and the chance of not being accepted? It takes courage to truly connect, both online and in life. This lack of courage results in the inability to live our truth, openly. I will highlight some key terms, while shedding some light on what the professionals in the field have to say about vulnerability, connection, shame and just how theses aspects work together in our relationships.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Corporate Art Collections
Something that people do not normally place together is art and the corporate business world. You go into an office where the walls are gray, the carpet is gray, and the cubicles are dark gray. No wonder 70% of Americans reported that they are unhappy in their job. In my research I am looking at the benefits of having and displaying a corporate art collection. Some of the things I have found is art and color make employees less stressed, more productive, and more creative. In the business world one of the most important aspects for a business is productivity so I know that what I will report on is beneficial for many managers and business owners. I also am taking my research a step further and learning how to implement a corporate art collection so that business owners and managers can acquire one for their organization to better their business and employees.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Curriculum Analysis for Primary Care Programs
Communication skills within healthcare has been a source of concern for several years. While many within medicine acknowledge the problem, communication skills of healthcare providers is still a large complaint amongst patients. In this study, I will be doing a curriculum analysis of primary care provider programs to determine if proactive steps are being taken to improve communication skills either in undergraduate prerequisites or in graduate coursework.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Debate: Attending childcare centers during the first 3 years of life is psychologically damaging to children.
We will be presenting the findings based on our research on childcare and the affect it has on young children.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Debate: The school year should be lengthened
Both sides of this debate will be presented, including scholarly research supporting each side. Based on this collection of research, group conclusions will also be discussed. This project fulfills requirements for FLHD 1500."


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Dino DNA
Our research is on separating organic material using a microfluidic device. A microfluidic device is used to prevent the mixing of liquids running through a tube. We are attempting to separate the organic material by using electric currents on either side of the device. Negatively charged material will be separated out to one side, positively charged material will be separated to the other side. The purpose of this research is to find a quick, and inexpensive way to separate DNA, which is negatively charged, from organic material. However, there are several other possible uses as well. Our research is currently still in the developmental stage. Right now, we are adding a frit to our device in order to separate our electrode vats from our main channel in order to maximize liquid flow while maintaining an electric charge.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

1:00pm MDT

DNA metabarcoding on local honey to determine quality and fraud
Honey is the product produced by bees after the hive has processed the nectar collected from nearby plants. Honey is a source of food for bees, and other organisms like humans, but it is often overproduced and the hive can’t use all of it. To deal with this, bees will store the extra honey in combs which can be harvested and sold. The cost of honey varies greatly based on the number of plant species used by the bees, the uniqueness of the flowers, and the type of bees producing the honey. As a result of the large number of factors that go into judging the quality of honey, it is very easy to defraud customers and charge more than the honey should be worth. The quality of honey can be judged by genetically sequencing the honey to identify the source of the nectar used by the bees. DNA metabarcoding, using the chloroplast trnL intron, will be used to identify the source of the pollen in honey obtained from local southern Utah producers. Native flora of southern Utah is expected to be seen in the DNA metabarcoding results if the honey is in fact produced in this area. If it is marketed as being produced locally and there is no evidence of native southern Utah flora, it can be assumed that the honey was not produced here. With the DNA metabarcoding results, the number and uniqueness of the flora can also be determined to give a hint at the quality of the honey. The species detected helps determine which flora are preferred among the local bees. This allows the community to continue planting and taking care of these local flora to better produce quality honey and healthier hives.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

1:00pm MDT

Investigation of Preferences in Ants
Harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex barbatus) are found worldwide. Mostly in desert or arid regions. These species forage over terrain when hunting for food sources. Researchers have also found that these, and other species, prefer to build habitat underground. We investigated choice preferences in a population of Pogonomyrmex barbatus from St. George. In one experiment, ants were given two types of food to choose from (natural food sources or human processed food). We measured the amount of each type of food we gave them and how much was eaten every other day. In the second experiment, ants will be put in a situation where they had to choose between two different habitat types (gel solution or sand). We will count how many ants choose each habitat and the differences in the tunnel structure. Data will be analyzed after 6 weeks.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

1:00pm MDT

Men and women are born into immutable gender roles
In this presentation, we will talk about men and women are born into immutable gender roles. In this current society, men and women now are fit in different working aspects in the world based on different abilities. The Diversity is becoming bigger and bigger.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Multiple dimensions of intelligence make standardized IQ testing obsolete
Standardized IQ testing has been used and highly regarded for many years. However, due to an increased understanding of human intelligence, traditional IQ testing may not be enough to cover the complexity of our intelligence. We will be studying the effectiveness of standardized testing, and looking into alternatives that may prove to be more holistic.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Sex education full disclosure vs abstinence
Our poster is to inform the viewers about the two commonly presented approaches for teaching sexual education. We will be presenting pros and cons about both sides of the controversial topic, we will then finish synthesizing the research we have found on this topic


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Synthesis of (Z)-Stilbene Derivatives
Stilbene and its derivatives are an exciting molecule with many applications. The carbon-carbon double bond present in the stilbene molecule prevents bond rotation. This leads to two isomeric forms of stilbene (E and Z). Different techniques have been used to obtain the E-Stilbene successfully. Among the several techniques to make a E-Stilbene, the Nobel Prize winning Suzuki cross-coupling reaction has been shown to be effective. However, it remains a synthetic challenge to synthesize the Z-stilbene isomer. Moreover, no one has studied the effects of substituents (electron-donated, electron-withdrawing, or sterically hindered) on the novel photoredox catalyzed isomerization reaction. We propose to study these substituents effects on the synthesis of the E-to-Z isomerization reaction.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

1:00pm MDT

Synthesis of (Z)-Stilbene Derivatives
Stilbene and its derivatives are an exciting molecule with many applications. The carbon-carbon double bond present in the stilbene molecule prevents bond rotation. This leads to two isomeric forms of stilbene (E and Z). Different techniques have been used to obtain the E-Stilbene successfully. Among the several techniques to make a E-Stilbene, the Nobel Prize winning Suzuki cross-coupling reaction has been shown to be effective. However, it remains a synthetic challenge to synthesize the Z-stilbene isomer. Moreover, no one has studied the effects of substituents (electron-donated, electron-withdrawing, or sterically hindered) on the novel photoredox catalyzed isomerization reaction. We propose to study these substituents effects on the synthesis of the E-to-Z isomerization reaction.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

1:00pm MDT

Synthesis of 4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-2-((1E,3E)-4-phenylbuta-1,3- dien-1-yl)-1,3,2-dioxaborolane by the 9-BBN Catalyzed Hydroboration of (E)-but-1-en-3-yn-1-ylbenzene
The production of organoboronic ester derivatives is becoming
increasingly important in modern organic synthesis due to their
versatility in forming C-C bonds by Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling
reactions. The goal of this research is to synthesize a pinacolborane-
substituted diene by the 9-BBN catalyzed hydroboration of the enyne
(E)-but-1-en-3-yn-1-ylbenzene. This hydroboration reaction is of special
interest because there are two potentially reactive sites (i.e. an alkene
and alkyne). Therefore, the opportunity to develop a novel and selective
method for the preparation of this class of compounds exists. In
addition, the product would be of high synthetic utility in the reactions
of dienes (Diels-Alder) and boronic esters (Suzuki-Miyaura). Here we
present our research on the synthesis of 4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-2-((1E,3E)-
4-phenylbuta-1,3-dien-1-yl)-1,3,2-dioxaborolane by the 9-BBN catalyzed
hydroboration of (E)-but-1-en-3-yn-1-ylbenzene.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

1:00pm MDT

Third-Party Punishment Preferences: Thief Gain and Victim Loss Matter, but Not Race or Punishment Motive
How much punishment is enough? Two preregistered, high-powered studies compared nominated fines with a thief’s gain and his victim’s loss, all in US dollars. Experiment 1 varied thief and victim race. Experiment 2 assigned a motive: deterrence, retribution, outcome differential, or welfare tradeoff ratio (with no motive as a comparison condition). Fines tracked thief gain and victim loss. Thief race, victim race, and assigned motives had no effect.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

1:00pm MDT

Vaccines
We are going to be researching both sides of the controversial topic of vaccines and displaying both on a poster board

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

10 Essential readieness of SUU
This poster will cover the importance of the 10 essentials for any and all who enjoy the outdoors and why you should always have it with you. This board will also cover the readiness of the SUU students. With SUU priding itself on its outdoor availability it has a surprising lack of the 10 essential list for the basic trips. This project will conduct a short study to find out how prepared the typical student is, and why each students neglect item.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

A Biodiversity Survey of Southern Utah Reptiles
Southern Utah fauna is comprised of a wide assortment of organisms from small mammals and lizards to deer and snakes. There are over 600 animal species in Utah with about 200 of them residing solely in the south. The purpose of this study is to conduct a preliminary population survey of reptiles in southern Utah. There are no published, comprehensive surveys of reptile habitat usage in southern Utah. In order to gain a broader understanding of the species living in the area, camera traps will be used to observe local reptilian species and estimate the herpetological biodiversity and habitat usage of Three Peaks Recreation Area, Quichapa Lake, and Old Iron Town. Each area is in a different geographical zone providing a rounded view of the animals living around 6,000 feet in elevation. Three Peaks is in the pine/oak belt, Quichapa is surrounded by grassland, and Old Iron Town is in the pinyon/juniper belt. We will set up 4 camera traps in each location. Photos will be collected weekly and analyzed for species type present. Walking surveys will also be conducted weekly in each location to assess the different varieties of herpetological species present.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Outdoor Engagement & Environmental Stewardship

1:00pm MDT

A Structural Comparison of Isozymes with Widely Varying Optimal Temperatures
We aim to compare the structural and functional differences between a hyperthermophilic isozyme and its thermophilic and non-extremophilic counterparts. Isozymes are enzymes with a different sequence and structure while catalyzing the same enzymatic activity. Each enzyme operates at an optimal temperature and pH, and these optimal conditions frequently vary in isozymes found in different organisms. The unique amino acid sequence of a given protein and its larger-scale structure are important factors for its stability and function under its uniquely preferred conditions. Our experiments are focused on determining the x-ray crystal structure of a hyperthermophilic enzyme, and comparing it to known structures of other isozymes that are optimally active at much lower temperatures. These structural comparisons will allow us to investigate structural details that underlie the stability and function in such extreme conditions.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Outdoor Engagement & Environmental Stewardship

1:00pm MDT

Become a Leader in the Outdoors
The IIC: Helping students become leaders in the outdoors and paying them to do it! This partnership between local outdoor agencies gives students the opportunity to intern in a variety of fields, applied in correspondence with the outdoors! Students are able to learn and apply new skills, all while gaining an understanding and appreciation of our public lands.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Evolution of Wood Warbler (Parulidae) Song
The Parulidae, or Wood Warblers, is a family of birds found in the Americas. The song behaviors vary among species, particularly in repertoire size (i.e., how many unique song types each individual sings), the context in which different song types are sung, and whether one or both sexes sing. The variation in these traits could have been affected by variation in morphology (i.e., beak size and mass), habitat, or migratory behavior. To test these relationships, we collected data on these characteristics from the literature and mapped them using a published phylogenetic tree of 115 species in this family (Lovette et al. 2010). We also measured the frequency and modulation of archived songs using Raven bioacoustics software. Using these data, we will produce analyses to formulate and test new hypotheses on the evolution of song in this group and publish an updated review.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Outdoor Engagement & Environmental Stewardship

1:00pm MDT

Genetic analysis of diatoms in streams affected by the Brian Head Fire
Diatoms are single-celled organisms that live in water, and can provide information about water quality. We wanted to know how the 2017 Brian Head Fire affected stream quality in southern Utah, but diatom morphology is difficult to learn in a short period of time. However, diatoms can be identified from their DNA even without training in morphological analysis. We collected diatoms from 4 streams within the watersheds affected by the Brian Head Fire then extracted DNA from all the diatom communities. We used Next Generation Sequencing to identify over 14,753 thousand operational taxonomic units (OTU) associated with known diatom species, genera, and families. To look for patterns associated with effects of the fire, we sorted these data by abundance at each site and level of taxonomic classification (species, genus, family, order, etc.). Our work demonstrates the wide variety of diatoms that live in Utah’s streams, as well as the number of diatom species for which genetic information has not been uploaded into world wide genetic databases.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Outdoor Engagement & Environmental Stewardship

1:00pm MDT

Impacts of the Brian Head Fire on the Freshwater Macroinvertebrates of the Markagunt Plateau (2016-2019)
In the summer of 2017, a fire started near Brian Head in Iron County, Utah burned more than 70,000 acres of coniferous forest on the Markagunt Plateau. We measured the effects of this fire on the macroinvertebrate fauna in three streams that run through and adjacent to the burn area. Samples were taken from Mammoth, Castle and Lowder Creeks during the fall and winter of 2018/2019. We were able to compare these data with a pre-fire study done in the same streams in the fall of 2016. We found a decrease in diversity for most taxa sampled. Future sampling will continue to monitor the recovery of these streams.

Speakers
avatar for Fredric Govedich

Fredric Govedich

Associate Professor, SUU
Freshwater Ecology and Leech Biology and Natural History


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Outdoor Engagement & Environmental Stewardship

1:00pm MDT

Importance of Collaborative Skills in the Workforce
Collaborative skills are vital in the workforce. Knowing how to communicate, work effectively as a team, and problem-solving are skills essential in nearly all work environments. The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA), the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), and Southern Utah University (SUU) have worked together to create a virtual collaborative environment through projects like DATIM, which is an online database of collected data on the United States’ forests. In order for the FIA, UNLV, and SUU to collaborate effectively, tools such as shareable drives and calendars, group calls and meetings, and communication skills are vital. However, one’s personal collaborative skills are often not discussed. What skills are needed for students to be prepared for collaboration in the workforce? Through this project, we will review the skills that are essential to effectively work in a collaborative environment, and key methods to have a successful virtual team.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Marine Species Preservation
The human race is having many negative impacts on marine species. Not only are animals being threatened, but also oceanic plants and microorganisms. Such negative impacts include the endangerment, extinction, and overall decline of the organism's health and natural well-being. The Endangered Species Act of 1973 was put into place with the intention of stopping impacts like these from progressing to fatal outcomes, but there are problems with the Act in and of itself. If this continues, humanity will end up ruining the entire oceanic biome and lose the beneficial natural resources the “Big Blue” provides for us. In order to preserve our planet for the generations to come, we as a society need to make a conscious effort to conserve our precious oceans and their inhabitants.

Speakers
AL

Alyson Lamoreaux

School of Integrative & Engaged Learning Assistant, Southern Utah University
Business Management & Economics Double-Major, Finance Minor; Honors Student


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Outdoor Engagement & Environmental Stewardship

1:00pm MDT

Perception of Educational Videos Based on Narrator’s Gender
As research assistants in the Outdoor Engagement Center, we work in cooperation with the Forest Service on the development of the DATIM database, which contains vegetation inventory data collected by the Forest Service. We have been tasked with compiling a training module for this application to assist both government workers and the general public. Research conducted by Springer Science & Business Media B.V. (2012) shows that more men have been employed as salesmen, radio announcers, and sports commentators than women. It can be argued that because men tend to have lower pitched voices they are generally perceived as easier to understand and therefore more effective in the areas of selling products and narrating events.
This research project builds upon the findings of Springer Science & Business Media B.V. (2012) by examining how the voices of men and women differ in their perceived effectiveness in communicating information through video narration. To determine the perceived effectiveness of communication, a group of participants viewed a training video and were assessed on their understanding of the information. Half of the participants were instructed to watch a video from the DATIM training module that was narrated by a man, while the other half watched a video narrated by a woman. Participants filled out a questionnaire that assessed their understanding of the content. Results were compiled to determine whether women’s or men’s voices were easier to understand. The efforts of this research can then be applied to many different aspects of technology and learning, such as future production of instructional videos in our collaborative project.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Possible New Species of Sea Spider Discovered in the Midwaters of Monterrey, CA
Sea spiders are a relatively poorly understood group of invertebrates found throughout the entire world's oceans and seas. They can be relatively small (1mm) to extremely large (70cm). 3 specimens (1 adult male, 1 adult female, and 1 male juvenile) were collected from midwaters just off the coast of California in the Monterrey Submarine Trench. Their characteristics were observed and determined to all belong to the Genus Pallenopsis and the Subgenus Bathypallenopsis. We compared the morphological features of these 3 specimens to each other and to other similar species. These features were photographed as well as illustrated. We found that the male adult and juvenile likely constitute a new species and that the female may additionally be its own species. Further work is needed to determine the case for the female, but it is certain that there is at least one new species. The closest match to these species is P. cornea, which lacks the same spine arrangement on its ovigers and has other characteristics that make them separate.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Robinson Helicopters Safety
Have you ever thought about flying or have flown in a helicopter that people say it is not the safest helicopter? If so, you have probably heard about Robinson Helicopters. They are a helicopter that was designed to be the best low cost helicopter. Just because they are low cost does not mean they are less safe, it just means the pilot has to be more aware of the aircraft and their surroundings. Here are some accident reports and surveys to prove my point.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Significance of Quichapa lake for Migratory Birds
Quichapa Lake is an ephemeral body of water that is also the most biodiverse area for birds in iron county. Many bird species stop at the lake during critical times of migration. We have monitored the lake in order to better asses this diversity during peak periods of migration and also compared our results with the more extensive eBird database. Several species have been shown to rely on Quichapa during these periods.



Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Outdoor Engagement & Environmental Stewardship

1:00pm MDT

Survey of Coleopteran species of Spring Creek Canyon
A study of coleopteran species found in Spring creek Canyon in Southern Utah. The study aims to use different colored pitfall traps as a means of collecting a variety of different species found in Spring Creek Canyon near New Harmony, Utah. This area’s coleopteran species are not well documented, therefore this area was determined a suitable area for research. It was hypothesized that different species of beetles would be attracted to different colored pitfall traps. The study provides a better look into Southern Utah’s beetle fauna and their behaviors.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Outdoor Engagement & Environmental Stewardship

1:00pm MDT

The effect of urbanization on genetic diversity in southern Utah ant populations
Genetic diversity is critical to a species's survival and the ability to adapt to changing environments. Conservation geneticists can use genetic diversity for various species in a habitat to determine the overall health. With this information, conservation geneticists can prevent extinction and improve population viability. Ants (Formicidae) are tiny, invertebrate omnivores found all around the globe and are considered to be good indicators of ecosystem health. Our main goals were to characterize the population genetic structure and to investigate the effect of urbanization on genetic diversity in southern Utah. Samples were collected throughout Cedar City (Canyon Park, Lake at the Hills, and Main Street), and outside of Cedar City (SUU Mountain Center and Three Peaks Recreation Area). DNA was extracted with Qiagen's DNeasy Blood and Tissue Kit and amplified at 10 previously characterized microsatellite loci. Genetic diversity will be compared between urban (Cedar City locations, rural (SUU Mountain Center), and mixed use (three Peaks Recreation Area) lands to see if urbanization negatively affects ant biodiversity, potentially decreasing ecosystem health.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Wilderness and Archaeological Site Stewardship
As I'm bring my time at SUU to a close, I have chosen to top off my studies of both Anthropology and Outdoor Recreation with a volunteer based project to gain in-the-field experience. I will be participating in a wilderness stewardship training and volunteering as a site steward in order to help protect both natural and cultural resources. I will be exploring what both land and cultural site stewardship means and I will be presenting on my experiences, what I learned, and the importance of being able to read the natural landscape in relation to archaeological work.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Childless, Single Female's Knowledge and Attitudes about Breastfeeding
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has recommended that mothers exclusively breastfeed their infants for the first six months of life, followed by continued breastfeeding (BF) with the introduction of complementary foods for one year or more. The AAP continues to maintain this recommendation as the ideal feeding pattern for infants, which provides optimal nutrition and health protection throughout life. There is extensive research to support the benefits of BF; however, the rates of BF in the United States have been suboptimal, and were at an all-time national low in 1971 at only 24%. Since that time, rates of initiation of BF have increased to 83.2%, yet only 24.9% of infants were exclusively breastfed at the age of 6 months. To increase rates of BF, various obstacles have to be overcome. Lack of support in the home, false perceptions of the partner’s attitude, and lack of knowledge of the benefits contribute to the cessation of BF. Whereas previous studies examined attitudes of fathers, pre-natal, and post-partum couples, the purpose of this study was to determine childless, single females’ knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about BF. Four hundred sixty six females (mean age 18.9 ± 1.4) were surveyed, and participant attitudes and beliefs were questioned. Although the surveyed population was generally very supportive of BF, a significant number of knowledge-based questions were answered incorrectly or were not known by the majority of participants. In response to the statement, “Not all women can produce quality breastmilk,” 75.5% of participants answered with “True.” 52.7% of participants did not know what mastitis was. Similarly, 45.9% did not know if mothers with a cold, flu, or fever should continue breastfeeding. Educating young adult females regarding BF might improve social acceptability and increase BF rates.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Cognitive declines requires mandatory retirement laws: debate
This will be a debate about mandatory retirement laws as a result of cognitive declines in old age. We will look at both sides of the issue and provide some support for both.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Energy Expenditure, Heart Rate and Wearable Devices: Sport Modes Versus General Modes
Wearable wrist worn tracking devices have become more popular, with the capacity to track steps, heart rate and energy expenditure. Little research has been done on the accuracy of the energy expenditure measures from these devices and no research has indicated if there is any advantage to using a sport specific mode for estimating energy expenditure. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the accuracy of caloric energy expenditure and heart rate measures from these wearable devices changes when using the pre-programmed sport modes versus the general exercise modes. Two of the most popular wearable devices were selected for evaluation, the Fitbit Ionic and the Polar Vantage M. Approximately 12 apparently healthy, recreationally active adults will be recruited via word of mouth. Participants will include both men and women. Each participant will be asked to attend three laboratory sessions. At each session they will be fitted with the wrist-worn devices as well as a face mask for collecting expired gases and a Polar heart-rate monitor (chest worn strap). During each session, participants will perform two 10 minute intervals of steady state exercise on a treadmill, stationary bicycle, or elliptical. Participants will be asked to exercise at a “moderately hard” intensity for all modes of activity. Devices will be set on general mode for one interval and sport-specific mode for the other. Work rates will be matched for both intervals. Energy expenditure estimates using the pre-programmed sport modes from each device will be compared to the estimated energy expenditure from the general activity mode. In addition, the energy expenditure from the wearable devices will be compared to criterion measures of energy expenditure determined from measures of gas exchange during those same activities. Significance for all comparisons will be set at p


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Factors Contributing to Sleep Deprivation in College Students
The survey was conducted to record variables known to affect students quality of sleep and measure possible correlations between sleep and performance. The variables that are being measured were chosen due to their relevance to sleep seen in modern research. The questions directed toward performance were chosen to measure statistical correlations of sleep to performance.
Inaccuracies are possible to occur due to the subjective nature of perceived experience. The survey method itself is known for being vulnerable as it must record this subjective experience. This may skew the data
Another possible danger is the time in which the survey is taken, as the possible results might change when taken in different times of day, week, month, and year.
The last risk is from abnormalities. Students with extreme temporary conditions, or those who are going through an unusual interruption in their sleep hold the threat of skewing the data.
Studies design: Our survey is geared toward Southern Utah University (SUU) college students between the ages of 17-24, but allows for students that are attending and are not within the specified age range so long as they are students of SUU. A number of college students will be surveyed. That data will be used to determine significant factors that affect the quality and quantity of sleep of SUU college students.

Speakers
avatar for Maura Knutsen

Maura Knutsen

I am a Sophomore at Southern Utah University, and loving it! My passions include: traveling, being in the outdoors, surrounding myself with friends and family, and of course... food! I have been fortunate enough to travel the world with my family, and love to share my stories, but... Read More →


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Gay and Mormon: How a Bishop Can Help
Being a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and gay can be difficult. Though research has found a positive impact on physical and mental health for those who attend religious services (Koenig, King, & Carson, 2012), members of the LDS church who identify as homosexual have higher rates of mental health issues, including higher levels of stigma, shame and psychological distress (Joseph & Cranney, 2017; Cranney, 2017). Consequently, a number of these individuals are likely to turn to their church leaders for support but unfortunately many LDS ecclesiastical leaders are unsure how best to proceed.
In an attempt to help this population, a survey of 362 LDS homosexual individuals was administered. Two hundred and seven reported what they found helpful and unhelpful in these interactions. Participants reported experiences were analyzed by three researchers who identified five recurring themes in what was shared.

1) Unconditional love and acceptance - this appeared to be the quality that most participants sought after. Given the negative experiences both in and out of the church, they were looking for acceptance and for those who found it, were quite pleased.
2) Knowing when to preach - sometimes preaching okay, but a bishop had to know when to do it. Often it was important to establish a firm relationship before offering advice.
3) Avoid fixing - a number individuals felt the bishop offered suggestions that didn’t fit for them, and were generally turned off by this.
4) Didn’t know what to do - participants varied in their feelings about this. Some appreciated that the bishop owned that he didn’t know what to do, others were disappointed that he didn’t.
5) Shaming - this was the most challenging response. A small number significantly felt judged in their interaction and came away feeling worse.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Relationship between Maladaptive pornography consumption and maladaptive video game addiction.
Pornography use is very common in the United States and has been associated with many negative outcomes (McBride, Reece, & Sanders, 2007). Some of these include social isolation, relationship problems, depression, as well as problems with work (Schneider, 2000). While pornography use is associated with a variety of negative outcomes, it is less clear why for some, porn use does and does not lead to negative outcomes. More than half of those individuals using pornography believe that it negatively impacts them in at least one major life domain (Twohig, Crosby, & Cox, 2009). For users of pornography evidence has been found to suggest that compulsive behaviors often function to reduce aversive thoughts, feelings, or sensations through distraction or experiential avoidance (e.g., Baker et al., 2004; Chawla & Ostafin, 2007). Video gaming has become one of the most common pastimes for many adults (Wittek, et al., 2015; Van Rooij, 2014). Although it is becoming a preferred activity for a large portion of the world, a subset of this population has emerged of those who develop problematic gaming habits (Garcia-Olivia, et al., 2016; Wittek, et al., 2015). Problematic video gaming has been related to multiple negative health outcomes including, depression, loneliness and addiction (Wittek, et al., 2015; Van Rooij, 2014).Problematic pornography and video game use seem to have very similar types of negative outcomes (e.g., Carboneau, 2018; Garcia-Olivia, et al., 2016; McBride, Reece, & Sanders, 2007; Wittek, et al., 2015). Additionally, the mechanisms that make them both problematic may be similar, specifically compulsivity, experiential avoidance or maladaptive coping.We hypothesize that there is a relationship between problematic gaming and pornography use and that this comorbidity may be due to the use of experiential avoidance as a maladaptive coping mechanism which may be a moderating factor.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Sex Perspective Rigidity and Empathetic Responses to People in Distress
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between sex perspectives and empathy. Sex perspective is the ability to see oneself as the opposite sex. Sex perspective (SP) rigid people cannot or refuse to see themselves as being the opposite sex. SP flexible people can. This construct differs from traditional perspective taking, which is defined as the ability to adopt someone’s psychological point of view (Davis, 1980). SP taking takes this ability to the next level.
We tested the hypothesis that SP rigid participants will score lower on the Toronto Empathy Questionnaire and that they will show smaller autonomic reactions to a person in distress, relative to their flexible counterparts. We tested 25 men and 87 women attending a medium sized university in the southwestern United States. The analysis of our data is on-going and will be presented at the Festival of Excellence. Should our hypothesis be supported, the SP construct might provide a means of predicting who is most likely to engage in sex discrimination.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Silver Nanoparticles Ability to Identify Capping Ligands for Early Disease Detection
Silver nanoparticles are of interest because of their chemical, antimicrobial, and other properties. We have developed a method to make silver nanoparticles using a microfluidic device. When made with reagents commonly used in silver nanoparticle fabrication, the device allows the consistent fabrication of high concentrations of nanoparticles. We have extended this method to use non-conventional capping ligands – molecules intended to coat the outside of the nanoparticle and determine its final size and shape. Most silver nanoparticles use organic molecules as capping ligands (often citrate). We fabricated nanoparticles using common biological molecules – a lipid (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine), a vitamin (vitamin B), and a protein (bovine serum albumin) – as capping reagents. The objective is to determine whether the capping ligand can be identified by the nanoparticles that grow when it is present. If successful, this research could lead to new methods to identify disease (such as Alzheimer’s disease), potentially at an early stage.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Testing the Accuracy of Popular Wrist Worn Tracking Gadgets at Measuring Energy Expenditure and Heart rate in College Age Joggers at Varying Grades on a Treadmill
Wrist-worn activity tracking devices have become increasingly popular in the last several years. These devices are commonly used to measure steps, heart-rate, and energy expenditure during physical activities. Walking and jogging are two of the most common activities for health and fitness, and are commonly assessed using these wearable devices. The accuracy of these devices for treadmill activities at different speeds and grades is debatable. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of energy expenditure and heart rate measures for two of the most popular devices (Garmin Vivoactive 3, FitBit Ionic) during walking and jogging at different treadmill grades. Participants will be recruited by word of mouth among apparently healthy, recreationally active adults. Approximately 15 participants will be recruited, both men and women. Participants will be asked to attend two laboratory sessions. During the first session, participants will be fitted with the two wrist-worn activity devices, one on each wrist. They will then be fitted with a Polar heart rate monitor (chest worn strap and receiver) as well as a face mask for collecting expired gases to determine energy expenditure. Participants will then complete three steady state walking intervals at three different grades (0%, 3% and 6% treadmill grades). They will be asked to walk at a brisk pace for approximately 10 minutes during each interval. The second laboratory session will consist similar measurements during jogging intervals at a “moderately hard” pace. For each participant, the treadmill grade order will be randomized for each session. Energy expenditure will be determined from gas exchange measures using indirect calorimetry. Heart rate values from the Polar heart rate monitor will be recorded. Accuracy of the devices for each exercise condition will be determined using ANOVA with significance set at p

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

The Effect of Skin Tone on the Accuracy of Heart Rate Measurement of Wrist-Worn Fitness Trackers During Resting and Sub-Maximal Activity
Wrist-worn fitness trackers are becoming increasingly popular. However, research has shown that the reliability and accuracy of these devices can vary. Darker skin tone has been suggested as one cause of error among these Light Emitting Diode (LED) based measurement devices. The purpose of this study is to determine whether skin tone has an effect on the accuracy of heart rate measurements in these wearable devices. Participants will be recruited by word of mouth at Southern Utah University (SUU), and through the SUU Office of International Affairs. Demographics will be recorded, and participants must be apparently healthy adults with a BMI less than 30 kg/m². To classify skin tone, pictures of the dorsal side of the wrist will be taken for each participant and classified by two separate investigators at a later time using Felix Von Luschan’s chromatic scale (VLCS). In addition, a different investigator will classify the skin phototypes of all participants using the Fitzpatrick skin phototypes criteria. The average VLCS score must match the Fitzpatrick classification for participants to be included. Participants will then be grouped based on their Fitzpatrick category I-VI with approximately ten in each classification group. Participants will wear the fitness trackers (Fitbit Ionic, Polar Vantage M, and Garmin Vivoactive 3) during 15-20 minutes of rest and 15-20 minutes of submaximal cycling at a perceived exertion of “moderately hard”. Heart rate measurements from the trackers will be compared to data from a polar chest-strap heart rate monitor as the criterion measure. Heart rate error values will be compared across classification groups for each device using ANOVA to determine if skin color impacts the accuracy of heart rate measurements in each group for each device. Results are yet to be determined.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

The Impact of Religiosity and Pornography Addiction on Shame, Anxiety, and Hope based on Gender
In addition to the increased pornography use, porn addiction has been on the rise with 33% of men report being addicted to pornography (Huffington Post, 2014). An increase in certain negative emotions has been associated with this increase in porn use. Researchers found that participants who were recruited from an online pornography treatment program showed higher levels of shame in comparison to other participants (Gilliland et al., 2011). Many studies have also found that a primary reason why individuals seek pornography is to alleviate feelings of anxiety and depression (Riermersma & Sytsma, 2013; Hall, 2013). This issue is especially relevant in Utah with higher than average rates of depression and suicide.
Our research project was conducted with 456 Southern Utah University students who filled out an online self-report questionnaire. This questionnaire included demographics including religiosity, the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (Lovibond, 1995), the pornography addiction screening tool (Bulkley & Foote, 2013), Self-Control Scale (Tangney, 2004), and a Personal Pornography Shame Scale (Mock, 2017). We ran multiple regression tests on shame, anxiety, and hope as outcome variables with porn addiction and religiosity as predictor variables based on sex.
We didn’t find any significant interactions, but we found several differences in significant correlations between men and women, making sex a moderator for several measures. Anxiety was connected to religiosity for men but not for women, shame was negatively correlated with religiosity for men but not for women, and men also had a significant negative correlation between hope and porn addiction, whereas women did not. Our results suggest that perceived pornography addiction was a better predictor than religiosity when it comes to anxiety, shame, and hope.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

The school year should be lengthened
We as a group in our FLHD class will argue why we think the school year should be lengthened. With this being said we will come top with some pros and cons to persuade our audience to show the audience our perspective on this topic.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Tips, Tricks and Risks: Social Risk Taking in Young Adults
Today’s society has seen a shift in the public awareness of sexual harassment and assault. While this is seen as a progressive and beneficial change by some, others are concerned that the change may create a culture of fear in which innocent gestures can be misinterpreted and individuals feel less free to interact with others in a social setting. Past research on behavior has seen risk-taking as an evolutionary tactic in order to attract a mate or gather resources (Greitemeyer, Kastenmuller & Fischer, 2013). However, risk-taking behavior is also linked to criminal and other deviant behavior, so criminologists have tried to find a way to control and deter risk-taking for centuries (Monachesi, 1955). Recent research has found links between risk-taking behavior and personality traits, as well as sex and peer influences (Turchik, Garske, Probst & Irvin, 2010; Van Hoorn, Crone & Leijenhorst, 2016). In this project, I propose to use a modified Balloon Analog Risk Task (BART) simulation to examine in which social situations individuals are more or less willing to take risks. Are people more willing to take a risk by flirting, or in non-sexually related interactions? In addition, I will determine whether or not the severity of the consequences for unwelcome flirting or joking behavior will lead individuals to take fewer risks in these areas, and if personality has any predictive ability for risk-taking behavior. There will be approximately 200 participants age 18-25 recruited from among Southern Utah University students. These results may be important in influencing different anti-sexual harassment programs and movements at the university level.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

What is the Accuracy of Wearable Tracking Devices in Determining a Resting Energy Expenditure Based on Training Status?
Wearable fitness trackers are increasingly popular. Why? Data. Active people want to know the effectiveness of their training. They want to chart the quantity and quality of their hard work and dedication so they can use that information to improve their workouts. One of the measurements calculated by these devices is caloric expenditure both at rest and during physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of two wearable tracking devices—the FitBit Ionic and Garmin Vivoactive 3 in determining resting energy expenditure (REE). REE is defined as the amount of energy (calories) used during sedentary, every day activities. A secondary purpose was to determine if the accuracy varies by training status of the individual wearing the device. Each participant completed a maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) test to determine training status.They were then placed into one of three fitness groups based on their VO2max measures: highly trained, moderately trained, and untrained. In a separate session, REE of each participant was measured using a laboratory-grade metabolic cart and measures of gas exchange. During the same REE test, each wearable fitness tracking device was worn to obtain a predicted REE. The predicted REE from each device and measured REE were then compared with ANOVA, with statistical significance set at p

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

New Zealand Pycnogonids (Sea Spiders)
We are examining a collection of intertidal pycnogonids from several different localities in New Zealand. They are from the Auckland Museum, Auckland, New Zealand originally collected by Margaret Morley, Conchology Section, Auckland Museum. There are nine specimen lots, seven of which are pycnogonids. The eighth one is a bryozoan upon which some of the pycnogonids were found, and the ninth one is a marine mite instead of a pycnogonid. So far we have identified all seven of the pycnogonid specimen lots to genus (Achelia sp, Ammothea sp, Anoplodactylus sp, and Callipallene sp) and of these seven, it looks like several of them may be new species. Our research consists of examining each specimen lot, photographing and describing the specimens, and then consulting the scientific literature for the Australian and New Zealand areas in an attempt to identify the specimens down to species. If it turns out that we have any new species, they’ll be formally described and prepared for publication in a scientific journal.

Speakers
avatar for Fredric Govedich

Fredric Govedich

Associate Professor, SUU
Freshwater Ecology and Leech Biology and Natural History


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:00pm MDT

Speed Science: Teaching Students How to Learn from Failure
Teaching students how science works is often difficult because students have been trained that they are “seeking” a specific answer and that if they do not find it then they have failed. This is very different from how science really works, but it can be difficult to break students of this in a ‘safe’ environment where students can be encouraged to learn about science and where you can allow students to fail in a way that they can learn from it. Speed Science was developed as a way to encourage students to think about how science works and apply what they know to developing a short experiment, collecting data and then presenting what they learned. All of this is done during one lab period and includes feedback from the instructor and fellow students. It also provides a way that students can learn from their mistakes and develop a deeper understanding of how science works.

Speakers
avatar for Fredric Govedich

Fredric Govedich

Associate Professor, SUU
Freshwater Ecology and Leech Biology and Natural History


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)
  Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

1:00pm MDT

To spank or not to spank?
Will be discussing pros and cons of physical discipline to children or spanking your children.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:00pm - 1:55pm MDT
LIB - Reading Room (2nd Floor)

1:10pm MDT

Theatrical Balance: A Day in the Life of a Stage Manager
A life in the theatre is notoriously hectic. Actors, directors and technicians alike spend most of the day in a tailspin of activities. While this makes for some incredible art and honest expression on stage, like any business someone has to maintain balance. That is where I come in as a stage manager. Through a series of organizational techniques and industry tricks I bring balance and communication to the collaborative behemoth that it theatre. In the Presentation I will demonstrate and explain the aspects of my job that create that balance that is so desperately necessary to my field.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:10pm - 1:20pm MDT
JT - Randall Jones Lobby
  Creative Expression & Analysis

1:15pm MDT

Hannah Sams (BFA Exhibition, Photography)
Visionary
Past to Present.
Fading memories to vivid dreams.
The past may not always be what one remembers.
And the present may sometimes appear bleak.
One must learn to let go of the past to be present.
Hold tight to the future.
Don’t float away.
Stay tethered.
Expectations aren’t always easily met.
The unknown can be haunting.
Sometimes it can be rewarding.
Look at the past as an ending. It’s blurry.
Look at the present as it builds the future. It’s clear.
Keep filling the balloon up.
Up.
Up.
Up.
Don’t let the dreams drift away.
Embrace them.
Fill the balloon until it’s ready.
I’m ready.

***********
With this series, I show the struggle of overcoming the cracks of the past to focus on the future. The inevitable deflation of the balloon is my timer. The past will always be there, but the balloon won’t haunt me.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:15pm - 1:30pm MDT
MA - SUMA

1:20pm MDT

BFA Design and Tech Portfolio
Representation of my works and accomplishments throughout my theatre experiences and career. Shows off my skills and involvement in different areas of the theatre community in portfolio form.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:30pm MDT
JT - Randall Jones Lobby
  Creative Expression & Analysis

1:20pm MDT

Community Engagement at SUU -- Vital and Varied
This presentation will illustrate the vitality and variety of community engagement endeavors at SUU. SUU was first named a Carnegie Community Engaged Institution in 2010, a status reaffirmed in 2015. At present, SUU is one of only 361 colleges and universities with this elective designation (less than 1% of all accredited higher education institutions in the country). The university is currently in the process of applying to be named a 2020 Carnegie Community Engaged Institution. The presenter directs SUU's Community Engagement Center and is overseeing the Self-Study and application that his due April 15, 2019. The presentation will explain the Carnegie designation and offer an up-to-date report on SUU's efforts to document and celebrate community engagement.

Speakers
avatar for Earl Mulderink

Earl Mulderink

Professor of History, Southern Utah University
Proponent and practitioner of community engagement and experiential learning.  Old dog eager to learn new tricks.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
BUS 242
  Community Engagement

1:20pm MDT

Parenting Parents
We are all studying Family Life and Human Development. In our Family Life Education class this semester, we will be studying and learning how to create and implement a program that will benefit the community. The final project for the class is presenting an example of a class that would be taught within the community. We are creating a program that will help adults know how to better parent their aging and elderly parents. Many individuals find that their parents moving in with them comes with a lot more challenges and changes than they expect. Some families are still caring for their own children, so having to care for their parents can be very taxing emotionally, physically, and financially. There haven’t been other past solutions regarding this topic, which is the reason we chose to research and plan classes for the community. Throughout the semester, we will be designing different classes around a) physical care, b) mental and emotional preparation, c) balancing finances, d) understanding mental and physical disabilities, e) accepting help from your children, and f) balancing time and energy between kids and elderly. We will present on just one of these aspects during our presentation at the Festival of Excellence, and that specific topic will be determined in the future.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
ED 215
  Community Engagement

1:20pm MDT

Alex and James
Alex and James, a play by Sean Militscher. This is a performance of the opening scene from a full-length piece I wrote. I will be performing the play in its entirety at the end of the semester. This play explores an aging gay couple when one partner contracts AIDS by cheating on the other. It also brings to light their relationship before this dramatic turn in two phases: The beginning of the relationship when they're in college, as well as the year before this incident.
The first scene takes place at the Four Corners National Monument. They have taken a road trip to try and ease their minds after learning of Alex's illness. It showcases the strain that the illness is taking on their relationship, but shows highlights of the kind of love they still have for each other.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
ST - Kolob Canyon Living Room

1:20pm MDT

No Small Parts: How and Why Artists Create Cohesion in Theatre Groups
A show’s performance quality is not explicitly influenced by the relationships of the actors to one another, but most actors and directors strive for a sense of community between the members of a production. How does a director develop that sense of connection and ensemble in a group of relative strangers in the short amount of production time? Drawing on techniques used in creating theatre and research in various ensemble-centered performance styles, I plan to research specific examples of how theatre groups create art, and read between the lines to understand how they also create community, as is done in devised theatre, co-creative theatre, and Anne Bogart’s Viewpoints. Articles from other disciplines including psychology, sociology, and anthropology may also be explored to see the concept of human community from various perspectives. Should the research dictate, I may also interview experts (defined for this project as a person with a large body of theatrical experience) within the theatre area of Cedar City about their experiences creating group cohesion in theatre, and possibly use my own directing experience as a case study concerning the natural coming-together of a theatrical group. It is my hope that research can be compiled into a comprehensive overview of methods and techniques that work (and perhaps those that do not) when creating community within a theatre group, and that this overview may be useful to theatre educators as they strive to build community within their programs, and to directors who are seeking to add a layer of community-building to their productions.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
BUS 243
  Creative Expression & Analysis

1:20pm MDT

The Relationship Between Climate Change and Refugee Movements
The current period in world history is a turbulent and uncertain one. Developed nations that could once be counted on to foster global stability are stressed, and relationships within NATO, the EU, and the UN are beginning to show increased strain. Despite pledges to reduce fossil fuel emissions globally, the world community lacks an organized response to climate change. Rising seas, longer and drier droughts, more extreme fire seasons, desertification, failing crops, unseasonably warm equatorial zones, and unpredictable weather patterns are just a few of the most visible impacts that currently impact the earth. These impacts force governments and people to react drastically in order to adapt to a warming and rapidly populating world. Burgeoning urbanization and population growth in world’s poorest countries further strains the environment and existing social infrastructure. In these places, there often exists a legacy of colonialism, imperialism, and predatory capitalism, along with religious fundamentalism that can compel desperate individuals to turn to acts of terror. Faced with these challenges, in addition to local armed conflicts, many millions of people seek refuge in the relative stability of the West. In response to the massive influx of people, Western policy makers have turned to increased border militarization, stringent immigration and citizenship laws, and efforts to forcibly assimilate foreign populations into their countries. This presentation begins by analyzing climate change in a contemporary setting as an increasing threat to global stability, and how climate change can exacerbate existing conditions that can lead to desperation and migration. It then examines mass movements of refugees and immigrants and the political response by developed powers to those mass movements, and the implications and consequences of those policies today.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
ED 204
  Global Engagement

1:20pm MDT

Painting 'My Odyssey": Jimmie Jones at the Grand Canyon
Jimmie Floyd Jones (1933-2009) is the greatest painter of Grand Canyon that no one—Grand Canyon historians, that is—has ever heard of. After graduating with a BFA from the University of Utah in 1961, Jones was a professional painter for fifteen years, focusing on figures and portraits. Most were of San Blas, Mexico, where he spent fourteen winters.
In 1977, Jones turned his attention to the Grand Canyon. He finished six works that winter, had a successful show at the Braithwaite Gallery in his home town, and found what he was meant to do: paint southern Utah and Grand Canyon. He called the latter, “My Odyssey.”
Over the next three decades Jones returned many times to Grand Canyon, completing a total of 125 works of the canyon. By the time he died in 2009, art historians in Utah were calling him “the pater familias of painters of the redrock” and saying that his work shows “a way of seeing that people have not seen before.” Those same historians rank Jones with the masters of Grand Canyon: Thomas Moran, W.H. Holmes, Gunnar Widforss, and Wilson Hurley.
My presentation will focus on Jones’ “Year of Decision” in the winter of 1977-78 when he learned how to paint Grand Canyon. Then I will take the audience through a brief tour of Jones’s maturation as a painter of what Clarence E. Dutton called “The most sublime and awe-inspiring spectacle in the world.” My research derives from my award-winning book, The Art and Life of Jimmie Jones: Landscape Artist of the Canyon Country.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
ED 202

1:20pm MDT

Poetry as a Form of the Subconscious Mind
The subconscious, or unconscious state of mind, is one that has yet to be explored or fully understood by the majority of humanity. When considering the possible aspects of the subconscious, the question of how to accurately convey the dimensions of an individual mind stands; there is no better way than to allow for a release and, in most cases, this can only be done through outward expression of an inner struggle. Infamous for his whimsicality and childlike perspective, William Blake introduces a rift in the ideology that is conformational poetics by accessing a component of the human mind which is often discontinued upon entering adulthood. If Blake stands by his argument that poetry pushes the bounds of purity and structure, it is acceptable to assume that the truest form of poetry is born, when and only when, a person is in connection with their subconscious. This theory of poetry can be attained through a multitude of bizarre, potentially uncomfortable methods, including but not limited to dreams, the use of drugs, prayer, and achieving a state of hypnosis. As seen in his poems such as The Tyger, The Lamb, and The Human Abstract, Blake’s work is heavily influenced by at least one—though conceivably multiple—connection to the subconscious mind. The mundane thought process of the average adult gives way to something that is greater than an emotion, a thought, or a mere image of inspiration. Blake tirelessly bares the innermost workings of his active subconscious, encouraging mankind to allow for the same susceptibility.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
BUS 246

1:20pm MDT

Recruitment and Retention of Hispanic Students
The number of Hispanics in the United States is increasing rapidly which has led to an increase in Hispanic children going to school. Many of these children maintain dreams and aspirations to further their education beyond high school whether it be at a trade school or a university. This project explores the innovations in the recruitment and retention of these students across the United States. The different strategies used by admission offices as well as student success offices to help these students enter and excel in their programs will be a main focus of this presentation. Many theories will also be identified to help articulate the vision and direction at Southern Utah University regarding these matters.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
ED 104

1:20pm MDT

The Art of Specimen Preservation
For this demonstration we will show how to create a museum study skin. Study skins are important for researchers who use historical data in their research projects. In biology labs, students use the skins to learn how to properly identify organisms based on morphological characteristics. We worked on an independent study project to make new avian study skins for student and researcher use. For our demo, we will show a time lapse video of how to make a study skin from beginning to end and will bring specimens at different levels of completion so the audience can see the process up close.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
LIB 201A

1:20pm MDT

What is a Library Worth?: A Practical Exercise in Capital Appraisal
Academic libraries are an aggregated resource. No one library collection is ever directly comparable to another library collection. Collection composition reflects acquisition opportunities over time, budgetary limits, varying programmatic needs, and physical condition. Standard accounting and appraisal methods break down when they are applied to an entire library collection. Nothing on capital valuation exists in the professional literatures of either accounting or library management. This presentation reports a successful project in 2012 which generated for the State of Tennessee a defensible and statistically valid capital valuation of an entire academic library collection. It discusses the limitations of appraisal processes as applied to large, complex entities such as library collections and explains the statistical processes used to make the assessment.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
BUS 238
  Leadership & Entrepreneurship

1:20pm MDT

Distribution and microbial use of molybdenum in soils west of Milford, UT
Our study looks at molybdenum concentrations in soil, and how molybdenum is being used by soil microbes and plants. Molybdenum is an essential component of nitrogenase, a nitrogen-fixing protein found in soil bacteria, as well as in other proteins important for sulfur and nitrogen cycles and for chemical reactions of small metabolites. In environments rich in organic matter, molybdenum is bound and retained by compounds made by plants, bacteria, and fungi. Our study site, just northwest of Milford, Utah, is in the area of outflow from a tungsten mine. Initial surveys found variable
molybdenum concentrations over an area of about six square miles, with at
least one small spot of much higher concentration rising and falling over about 0.2 miles. The ecology of our study site is much different than areas previously tested in that the main plants are widely-spaced sagebrush and occasional clumps of grasses. In some areas, the soil surface is covered with black cryptobiotic crust. In our previous work, we surveyed metal concentrations relative to sage bushes. Our current proposal includes comparisons of cryptobiotic crust with the underlying soil and amplicon sequencing to identify organisms in the cryptobiotic crust.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
ED 102
  Outdoor Engagement & Environmental Stewardship

1:20pm MDT

Pokemon Go: Gotta Help Them All Follow up Statistics
This year, I am following up on research I proposed last year: Pokemon Go is a force to be reckoned with. While the need to catch them all is not a new phenomenon, the ability to actually go out into the community to do so is. One obvious side effect is the exercise players are getting. However, a not-so-obvious side effect is how playing the game is helping those with social anxiety. There have been previous studies that show how gaming can help people with depression and generalized anxiety disorder, but the number or anecdotal reports of people getting out of their shell and talking to strangers for the first time while playing this game seems unprecedented. The benefits of this type of gaming can be life-changing for those with these mental issues. Between now and the next conference, I plan to gather data specifically on college students who have such issues and play Pokemon Go to show just how much help it can offer.

Speakers
avatar for Joy Sterrantino

Joy Sterrantino

Assistant Professor of English, SUU
I was born near NYC but mostly grew up in Las Vegas. I'm an INFJ on the Briggs-Meyers scale, which means I never quite feel like I fit in anywhere; but as I've gotten older, I care less about this than I used to, since I live mostly in my head anyway. It also means I can empathize... Read More →


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
BUS 126

1:20pm MDT

Suicide Awareness and Prevention
Festival of Excellence Application


The focus of our Festival of Excellence Presentation is a Family Life Education course taught on suicide awareness and prevention which will address the need for the course itself, teach effective prevention strategies, discuss the common warning signs, and let the community know what they can do to help stop suicide based off of our research on the subject. According to the CDC, suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death for 15-24 year old Americans, and the 4th leading cause of death for adults ages 18-65. With suicide rates rising across the nation, more and more lives are being lost that could be prevented. Through this course we hope to educate those struggling, or know someone who is struggling, to see signs and know how to effectively overcome the issues. One that might attend will learn coping exercises and guidance taught through the different classes the course offers. Because this is such a high leading cause of death we want to get the information out to those that need it. In the past, We hope to raise awareness about how prevalent suicide is in our society and help to reduce it through classes on self-esteem, perfectionism vs. wholeness, mental health, and warning signs/resources.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
BUS 120

1:20pm MDT

Dynamic Duo: What are you Missing in a Student Professor Relationship?
Profesor Jennifer Sorensen and Student Worker Daniel Delap

Abstract
This presentation examines how student workers and professors can have integral relationships. Students can enhance their leadership skills, be exposed to valuable academic experiences, and provide resources to students that are invaluable to their education.
This relationship can work both ways. Professors can incorporate student workers to experiment with new teaching methods, engage in mentoring students, and delegate tasks to help professors be more effective.
Students and professors can function as a team to generate new ideas for class assignments by offering different perspectives. From this difference, students and professors can tailor in-class experiences to be more beneficial for students. These opportunities provide students with an interest in education as well as a view into what their future as the educators of tomorrow will look like and help prepare them for post undergraduate work.
The implementation of these strategies could create beneficial learning environments for any discipline at SUU as well as help cultivate an open dialogue between members of the student body and faculty. The result is a healthy campus where students and professors receive direct input from each other.

Speakers
DD

Daniel Delap

Teaching Assistant, SUU
Daniel Delap is a Junior majoring in Rhetoric and Writing. He has enjoyed the experience of being a Student Worker/Teaching Assistant and looks forward to attending law school.
JS

Jennifer Sorensen

Professor, SUU
Professor Sorensen has taught composition classes at SUU since 2013. She has been working with her student worker, Daniel Delap, for the 2018-2019 school year.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
ED 111

1:20pm MDT

Student Designed OER Activities to Learn Mental Health Nursing
This presentation will discuss a curriculum innovation carried out within the course NURS 3240 in Mental Health Nursing as part of the SUU Curriculum innovation Grant. An assignment was included in the course for the students to individually design an innovative learning activity that would facilitate their understanding of the content, could be used in future SUU nursing program courses, and would be published for open use to expand the open education resources available for nursing education at large.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:35pm MDT
ED 103

1:20pm MDT

Numeral approximation for a Brussellator System
We will numerically study a Brusselator system, which is used to model the oscillating chemical reactions. We develop some numerical schemes that guarantee the existence of positive numerical solutions. We will also analyze the numerical schemes to find the conditions for the existence of a limit cycle of the difference system.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:20pm - 1:55pm MDT
BUS 244
  Innovation in Specialized Disciplines

1:30pm MDT

Technical Direction: The Only Direction
A show case of all the work I have done in my last 4 years in the Theater Arts and Dance Department.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:30pm - 1:40pm MDT
JT - Randall Jones Lobby
  Creative Expression & Analysis

1:30pm MDT

Jeremy Sorensen (BFA Exhibition, Graphic Design)
Doing what you love and having style while doing it has always been a value to me.  Empyrean, is a skateboard company that I created. I fuzed that same core value with the attitude of having limitless possibilities into Empyrean.  

I wanted to see this company through various media types.  The skateboards each have their own unique style, but still keep to the same basic characteristics between thick lines, patterns, and grid systems.  Ranging from skateboards that would be used for skating, or for viewing pleasure, there is something for everyone. I created a 3d version of the logo out of wood.  Pushing the characteristics from earlier, the shirts and stickers continued to show me the versatility and potential of where I can take Empyrean and its designs.

I have always enjoyed taking something and pushing it to find its full potential, and Empyrean’s potential has just begun.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:30pm - 1:45pm MDT
MA - SUMA

1:40pm MDT

Scenic Art Portfolio
I will be presenting my portfolio of scenic art and projects within the theater.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:40pm - 1:50pm MDT
JT - Randall Jones Lobby
  Creative Expression & Analysis

1:40pm MDT

Coordinating a Morning of Service
On October 27th, a group of over 50 volunteers spread across Cedar City to complete 8 different service projects for people in need. The project took a couple months to plan and a team of 12 people to coordinate, but left smiles on the faces of each of the service recipients. This presentation will describe the process of planning the project. Specifically, the project organizer, Joseph Lee, will discuss the effectiveness of providing a way for those willing to fund service and those willing to serve to connect with those in need of service.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:40pm - 1:55pm MDT
ED 215
  Community Engagement

1:40pm MDT

A Comparison of Chlorophyll Concentrations in Southern Utah Rivers and Streams
The presence of aquatic life is dependent upon the presence of chlorophyll in the water and surrounding plant life. We set out to determine the concentration of chlorophyl in in different bodies of water surrounding Southern Utah's Coal Creek. These results will be compared to the biodiversity found at these various sites to better understand the lack of biodiversities in different areas around Southern Utah.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:40pm - 1:55pm MDT
BUS 244

1:40pm MDT

It's Hair and There and Everywhere (Working Title)
Theatre has always had the ability and courage to take risks in its artistic endeavors, especially in the postmodern era. I will be researching how the musical, Hair: The American Tribal Love Rock Musical, was able to successfully intersect politics and theatre, while making large strides in history for both theatre and social change in the 1960s. The postmodern era is typically defined as post World War II, so I will be specifically dissecting this musical through the lens of theatrical postmodernism philosophy. I want to especially focus on the postmodern theory of “challenging norms” through the use of and study of the musical, Hair: The American Tribal Love Rock Musical. I will be looking at the dialogue and music of the show, as well as books on musical theatre with an emphasis on the topic of the musical Hair. I will also be reading articles and books that specifically discuss politics and theatre in the postmodern era to add to the discussion on Hair’s impact on both theatre and global politics in the 1960s. This is important to study today, because theatre is constantly evolving due to the politics and social changes that are happening around the world. Hair brought attention to the theatre and the politics of the time, and theatre is still capable of doing that today and that is why this research on the success and strife of Hair: The American Tribal Love Rock Musical, in the postmodern era of theatre is so important to understanding the future of politics in theatre.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:40pm - 1:55pm MDT
BUS 243
  Creative Expression & Analysis

1:40pm MDT

TJ and Dave do a Play
My partner and I will be performing a comedic scene from a popular, contemporary stage-play. We will be using minimal set, costume, make-up, lighting, and sound design. This will be a display of acting techniques of modern dramatists, such as Meisner, that we have learned and worked on in our Acting II class throughout this semester.


Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:40pm - 1:55pm MDT
ST - Kolob Canyon Living Room

1:40pm MDT

Diversity on Campus
As an international student, I would like to use the Festival Of Excellence as a platform to share my experience on the concept of diversity and the benefits of students being exposed to different ethnicities, race, and cultural background on campus before entering the workforce. Research validates the importance of such an exposure. For example, see the article, “Top 5 Ways Students Benefit From Diversity on Campus” by Brown (2016). They are many definitions of the term “Diversity” but for the purpose of this presentation, diversity is defined as -” group of people refers not just to their racial or ethnic background, but also their age, their education, their gender, and their life experiences.” Brown 2016, comments that “Not only does diversity enable students to work with people from other races, ethnicities and culture backgrounds, but it also challenges the views they are accustomed to leading to more awareness and understanding of difference beliefs and customs.” Southern Utah University (SUU) is an experiential learning environment where one of its mission is to foster intellectual and creative engagement within the SUU campus community. An interesting fact about SUU is that it has international students representing from over fifty countries. Clearly the concept of diversity within this university is enriching the educational experience of the students. Consequently, it is fair to say that this will also impact all the students and other campus member’s perspectives about globalization in general. My experience as an International student at SUU has increased my awareness about the importance and the need for a diverse campus. To conclude, this presentation aims talk about the different research on how students can benefit from diversity on campus and also my personal experience as international student at SUU.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:40pm - 1:55pm MDT
ED 204
  Global Engagement

1:40pm MDT

Fear, a Precursor to Progress
Why are we so afraid of fear? By exploring the prominent works of Renaissance philosophers Niccolo Machiavelli and Thomas Hobbes I explore how fear impacts the rulers and the ruled in The Prince and Leviathan respectively. Each philosopher utilizes fear in their thought process to provide the bedrock of thought for a majority of contemporary institutions, alongside providing a possible explanation for why we have organized society rather than anarchy. In understanding this we can then learn how to reduce our own fear of modern institutions designed to promote it.

Speakers

Tuesday April 2, 2019 1:40pm - 1:55pm MDT
BUS 238

1:40pm MDT

Linking morphological scaling and ecology in angiosperms
Corner’s rules describe a set of plant morphological scaling relationships between leaves, twigs, and branching density of vascular plants. These scaling relationships are likely dictated by physiological and biomechanical constraints, and are likely to correlate broadly with a species’ ecological strategy. In the angiosperm species that have been studied to da